ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.01 Academic Eligibility :

Policy 1.01 Academic Eligibility for Seek, College Discovery, and City University Supplemental Tuition Assistance
A student shall be deemed “educationally disadvantaged” upon application for admission and is hereby eligible for one of the special opportunity programs, if he or she satisfies any one of the following four criteria (BTM,1981,11-23,006,_A):
a) The student has received a general equivalency diploma. (BTM,1981,11-23,006,_A)
b) The Student has earned a college admission average of less than eighty percent or a rank in class of the sixty-fifth or lower percentile. (BTM,1981,11-23,006,_A)
c) The student has earned a college admission average of eighty percent or above or a rank in class above the sixty-fifth percentile but has received extensive remedial assistance in high school so that, in accordance with procedures to be established by the Chancellor, the student is determined to have need for the full range of support services available to students in the SEEK Program. (BTM,1981,11-23,006,_A)
d) The student is an applicant to a program that the Chancellor has identified as a program with highly competitive admission, but the student lacks a high school sequence in math and science or other specific matter normally required for such program. (BTM,1981,11-23,006,_A)
Subsequent to admission, certain additional students in need of extensive remediation may be identified as educationally disadvantaged in accordance with standards established by the Chancellor. Although not allocated to one of the special opportunity programs, such students will be eligible for participation in the Supplemental Tuition Assistance Program. (BTM,1981,11-23,006,_A)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.02 Academic Freedom :

Policy 1.02 Academic Freedom
The following principles of academic freedom, as expressed by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) in its 1940 Statement of Principles, were approved (CPM,1973,11-12,p009):
The purposes of the 1940 Statement of Principles of the AAUP are (CPM,1973,11-12,p009):
“To promote public understanding and support of academic freedom and tenure and agreement upon procedures and to assure them in colleges and universities. Institutions of higher education are conducted for the common good and not to further the interest of either the individual teacher or the institution as a whole. The common good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition.” The word “teacher” is understood to include all those who are members of the instructional staff as defined in the Bylaws of the Board of Trustees. (CPM,1973,11-12,p009)
“Academic freedom is essential to these purposes and applies to both teaching and research. Freedom in research is fundamental to the advancement of truth. Academic freedom in its teaching aspect is fundamental for the protection of the rights of the teacher in teaching and of the student to freedom in learning. It carries with it duties correlative with rights. (CPM,1973,11-12,p009)
“Tenure is a means to certain ends, specifically freedom of teaching and research and of extramural activities, and a sufficient degree of economic security, hence tenure, are indispensable to the success of an institution in fulfilling its obligations to its students and to society. (CPM,1973,11-12,p009)
“The teacher is entitled to full freedom in research and in the publication of the results, subject to the adequate performance of his other academic duties; but research for pecuniary return should be based upon an understanding with the authorities of the institution. (CPM,1973,11-12,p009)
“The teacher is entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing his subject, but he should be careful not to introduce into his teaching controversial matter which has no relation to his subject. Limitations of academic freedom because of religious or other aims of the institution should be clearly stated in writing at the time of appointment. (CPM,1973,11-12,p009)
“The college or university teacher is a citizen, a member of a learned profession, and an officer of an educational institution. When he speaks or writes as a citizen, he should be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but his special position in the community imposes special obligations. As a man of learning and an educational officer, he should remember that the public may judge his profession and his institution by his utterances. Hence he should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that he is not an institutional spokesman.” (CPM,1973,11-12,p009)
The City University of New York should remain a forum for the advocacy of all ideas protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution and the principles of academic freedom. (CPM,1973,11-12,p009)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.03 Academic Integrity :

Policy 1.03 Academic Integrity
Academic dishonesty is prohibited in The City University of New York. Penalties for academic dishonesty include academic sanctions, such as failing or otherwise reduced grades, and/or disciplinary sanctions, including suspension or expulsion. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
1 Definitions and Examples of Academic Dishonesty
1.1 Cheating
Cheating is the unauthorized use or attempted use of material, information, notes, study aids, devices or communication during an academic exercise. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
Examples of cheating include (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L):
a) Copying from another student during an examination or allowing another to copy your work.
b) Unauthorized collaboration on a take home assignment or examination.
c) Using notes during a closed book examination.
d) Taking an examination for another student, or asking or allowing another student to take an examination for you.
e) Changing a graded exam and returning it for more credit.
f) Submitting substantial portions of the same paper to more than one course without consulting with each instructor.
g) Preparing answers or writing notes in a blue book (exam booklet) before an examination.
h) Allowing others to research and write assigned papers or do assigned projects, including using commercial term paper services.
i) Giving assistance to acts of academic misconduct/ dishonesty.
j) Fabricating data (in whole or in part).
k) Falsifying data (in whole or in part).
l) Submitting someone else’s work as your own.
m) Unauthorized use during an examination of any electronic devices such as cell phones, computers or other technologies to retrieve or send information.
1.2 Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person’s ideas, research or writings as your own. Examples of plagiarism include (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L):
a) Copying another person’s actual words or images without the use of quotation marks and footnotes attributing the words to their source.
b) Presenting another person’s ideas or theories in your own words without acknowledging the source.
c) Failing to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments.
d) Internet plagiarism, including submitting downloaded term papers or parts of term papers, paraphrasing or copying information from the internet without citing the source, or “cutting & pasting” from various sources without proper attribution.
1.3 Obtaining Unfair Advantage
Obtaining unfair advantage is any action taken by a student that gives that student an unfair advantage in his/her academic work over another student, or an action taken by a student through which a student attempts to gain an unfair advantage in his or her academic work over another student. Examples of obtaining unfair advantage include (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L):
a) Stealing, reproducing, circulating or otherwise gaining advance access to examination materials.
b) Depriving other students of access to library materials by stealing, destroying, defacing, or concealing them.
c) Retaining, using or circulating examination materials which clearly indicate that they should be returned at the end of the exam.
d) Intentionally obstructing or interfering with another student’s work.
1.4 Falsification of Records and Official Documents
Examples of falsification include (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L):
a) Forging signatures of authorization.
b) Falsifying information on an official academic record.
c) Falsifying information on an official document such as a grade report, letter of permission, drop/add form, ID card or other college document.
2 Methods for Promoting Academic Integrity
2.1 Packets containing a copy of the CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and, if applicable, the college’s procedures implementing the Policy, and information explaining the Policy and procedures shall be distributed to all current faculty and, on an annual basis to all new faculty (full and part-time) These packets also shall be posted on each college’s website. Orientation sessions for all new faculty (full and part-time) and students shall incorporate a discussion of academic integrity. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
2.2 All college catalogs, student handbooks, faculty handbooks, and college websites shall include the CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and, if applicable, college procedures implementing the policy and the consequences of not adhering to the Policy. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
2.3 Each college shall subscribe to an electronic plagiarism detection service and shall notify students of the fact that such a service is available for use by the faculty. Colleges shall encourage faculty members to use such services and to inform students of their use of such services. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
3 Reporting
3.1. Each college’s president shall appoint an Academic Integrity Officer in consultation with the elected faculty governance leader. The Academic Integrity Officer shall serve as the initial contact person with faculty members when they report incidents of suspected academic dishonesty. The Academic Integrity Officer may be the college’s Student Conduct Officer, another student affairs official, an academic affairs official, or a tenured faculty member. Additional duties of the Academic Integrity Officer are described in Sections 4.1, 4.2.1, 4.2.2, 4.3 and 4.4. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
3.2. A faculty member who suspects that a student has committed a violation of the CUNY Academic Integrity Policy shall review with the student the facts and circumstances of the suspected violation whenever feasible. Thereafter, a faculty member who concludes that there has been an incident of academic dishonesty sufficient to affect the student’s final course grade shall report such incident on a Faculty Report Form in substantially the same format as the sample annexed to this Policy and shall submit the Form to the college’s Academic Integrity Officer. . Each college shall use a uniform form throughout the college, which shall contain, at a minimum, the name of the instructor, the name of the student, the course name and number and section number, the date of the incident, a description of the incident and the instructor’s contact information. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
3.3 The Academic Integrity Officer shall update the Faculty Report Form after a suspected incident has been resolved to reflect that resolution. Unless the resolution exonerates the student, as described in Section 4.4, the Academic Integrity Officer of each college shall place the Form in a confidential academic integrity file created for each student alleged to have violated the Academic Integrity Policy and shall retain each Form for the purposes of identifying repeat offenders, gathering data, and assessing and reviewing policies. Unless the student is exonerated, written decisions on academic integrity matters after adjudication also shall be placed in the student’s academic integrity file. The Academic Integrity Officer shall be responsible for maintaining students’ academic integrity files. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
4 Procedures for Imposition of Sanctions
4.1 Determination on academic vs. disciplinary sanction
The Academic Integrity Officer shall determine whether to seek a disciplinary sanction in addition to an academic sanction. In making this determination, the Academic Integrity Officer shall consult with the faculty member who initiated the case and may consult with student affairs and/or academic affairs administrators as needed. Before determining which sanction(s) to seek, the Academic Integrity Officer also shall consult the student’s confidential academic integrity file, if any, to determine whether the student has been found to have previously committed a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy, the nature of the infraction, and the sanction imposed or action taken. Prior violations include both violations at the student’s current college and violations that occurred at any other CUNY college. In making the determination on prior violations, the Academic Integrity Officer shall determine whether the student previously attended any other CUNY colleges and, if so, shall request and be given access to the academic integrity files, if any, at such other CUNY colleges. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
The Academic Integrity Officer should seek disciplinary sanctions only if (i) there is a substantial violation; or (ii) the student has previously violated the Policy; or (iii) academic sanctions are unable to be imposed because the student has timely withdrawn from the applicable course. Examples of substantial violations include but are not limited to forging a grade form or a transcript; stealing an examination from a professor or a university office; having a substitute take an examination or taking an examination for someone else; having someone else write a paper for the student or writing a paper for another student; sabotaging another student’s work through actions that prevent or impede the other student from successfully completing an assignment; and violations committed by a graduate or professional student or a student who will seek professional licensure. The college also should consider any mitigating circumstances in making this determination. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
4.2 Procedures in Cases Involving Only Academic Sanctions
4.2.1 Student Admits to the Academic Dishonesty and Does Not Contest the Academic Sanction
If a faculty member wishes to seek only an academic sanction (i.e., a reduced grade) and the student does not contest either his/her guilt or the particular reduced grade the faculty member has chosen, then the student shall be given the reduced grade, unless the Academic Integrity Officer decides to seek a disciplinary sanction. The reduced grade may apply to the particular assignment as to which the violation occurred or to the course grade, at the faculty member’s discretion. A reduced grade may be an “F” or another grade that is lower than the grade that the student would have earned but for the violation. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
The faculty member shall inform the Academic Integrity Officer of the resolution via email and the Officer shall update the applicable Faculty Report Form to reflect that resolution. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
4.2.2 Student Admits to the Academic Dishonesty but Contests the Academic Sanction
In a case where a student admits to the alleged academic dishonesty but contests the particular academic sanction imposed, the student may appeal the academic sanction through the college’s grade appeal process. The student shall be allowed, at a minimum, an opportunity to present a written position with supporting evidence. The committee reviewing the appeal shall issue a written decision explaining the justification for the academic sanction imposed. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
4.2.3 Student Denies the Academic Dishonesty
In a case where a student denies the academic dishonesty, a fact-finding determination shall be made, at each college’s option, by an Academic Integrity Committee established by the college’s governance body or by the Student-Faculty Disciplinary Committee established under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws. Each college’s Academic Integrity Committee shall adopt procedures for hearing cases. (If a college opts to use its Student-Faculty Disciplinary Committee for this purpose, that Committee shall use Article XV procedures.) Those procedures, at a minimum, shall provide a student with (i) written notice of the charges against him or her; (ii) the right to appear before the Committee; and (iii) the right to present witness statements and/or to call witnesses. Those procedures also shall provide the faculty member with the right to make an appearance before the Committee. The Committee may request the testimony of any witness and may permit any such witness to be questioned by the student and by the administrator presenting the case. Academic Integrity Committees and Student-Faculty Disciplinary Committees, as applicable, shall issue written decisions and send copies of their decisions to the college’s Academic Integrity Officer. The Academic Integrity Officer may not serve on a college’s Academic Integrity Committee. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
4.3 Procedures in Cases Involving Disciplinary Sanctions
If the college decides to seek a disciplinary sanction, the case shall be processed under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws. If the case is not resolved through mediation under Article XV, it shall be heard by the college’s Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
If the college seeks to have both a disciplinary and an academic sanction imposed, the college shall proceed first with the disciplinary proceeding and await its outcome before addressing the academic sanction. The student’s grade shall be held in abeyance by using the PEN grade established for this purpose, pending the Committee’s action. If the Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee finds that the alleged violation occurred, then the faculty member may reflect that finding in the student’s grade. The student may appeal the finding in accordance with Article XV procedures and/or may appeal the grade imposed by the faculty member in accordance with section 4.2.2. If the Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee finds that the alleged violation did not occur, then no sanction of any kind may be imposed. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
Where a matter proceeds to the Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee, the Academic Integrity Officer shall promptly report its resolution to the faculty member and file a record of the resolution in the student’s confidential academic integrity file, unless, as explained below, the suspected violation was held to be unfounded. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
4.4 Required Action in Cases of No Violation
If either the Academic Integrity Committee or the Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee finds that no violation occurred, the Academic Integrity Officer shall remove all material relating to that incident from the student’s confidential academic integrity file and destroy the material. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)
4.5 Implementation
Each college, in accordance with its governance plan, shall implement this Policy and may adopt its own more specific procedures to implement the Policy. Colleges’ procedures must be consistent with the policy and procedures described in the Policy. (BTM,2011,06-27,005,_L)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.04 Academic Program Elimination :

Policy 1.04 Academic Program Elimination
The Chancellor is directed and authorized to review all program offerings within the City University of New York—doctoral, masters, baccalaureate, and associate degree levels—and to determine those areas that are not justified by student demand, enrollment, quality, geographic distribution, or other relevant academic or fiscal criteria, and to recommend the elimination of such programs. (BTM,1976,04-05,008,__)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.05 Academic Program Planning :

Policy 1.05 Academic Program Planning
The Board of Trustees endorses the continuation and, where needed, initiation or intensification of campus-based planning, program review, and program development activities, and charges the Office of Academic Affairs to assist the colleges in achieving the goals of these processes. The Chancellor shall provide annual reports on the status and outcomes of campus-based planning and undertake additional reviews of academic program areas as appropriate. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)
The Board of Trustees affirms the importance of inter-college collaboration in offering academic programs and calls upon the colleges, using established appropriate governance mechanisms, to pursue such arrangements as are educationally appropriate through such means as jointly designed and offered programs, shared program resources, joint appointments of faculty, college-to-college articulation agreements, and coordinated course schedules. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)
The Board of Trustees urges the faculties of the City University of New York to work together within disciplinary, inter-disciplinary, and professional groupings, to identify ways in which each field can be strengthened across the University in areas such as curriculum, program development, faculty hiring and mentoring, and faculty development. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)
Within the context of academic program planning, the Board of Trustees affirms the importance of strong and effective University-wide policies and procedures on articulation to ensuring the maximum transfer of credits for students while maintaining academic standards and academic integrity. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)
The colleges and schools shall regularly review their bulletins and related publications to ensure that all listed programs and courses are actually available to students according to the terms indicated, and that courses are available with reasonable frequency. The colleges and schools shall inform the Chancellor of the results of these reviews. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)
The Chancellor shall coordinate the academic program and budget planning and implementation processes of the University to further the plans developed by the colleges and the goals and objectives set forth in this policy. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.06 Academic Program Review :

Policy 1.06 Academic Program Review
1 Certification Review by Campus Bodies
All academic programs failing to meet guidelines for certification review that identify adequate levels of activity and resources shall be subject to a program certification review process through which such programs shall be reviewed by campus bodies responsible for curricula. Programs subject to certification review that are endorsed for continuation at the campus level shall be considered for approval by the Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research. Programs that fail to receive the approval of appropriate college authorities and the Board of Trustees Committee shall be discontinued and decertified. After consultation with appropriate groups and governance bodies, and with the approval of the Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research and the Board of Trustees, the Chancellor shall issue guidelines for certification review that provide the basis for the certification review process. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)
2 Credit Requirements Review
The Chancellor shall undertake a review, including comparisons with other universities, of the number of credits required for completion of the City University of New York’s bachelors and associate degree programs beyond the number necessary for registration or accreditation and report the conclusions to the Board of Trustees by the end of the next academic year. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)
3 Programmatic Review
The following University-wide policy on formal, periodic academic program review is approved (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E):
3.1 Introduction
Formal, periodic academic program review is a common practice at colleges and universities in the United States. For some academic programs, particularly those in pre-professional or professional fields, such review is part of an accreditation process conducted by an external agency, usually a national professional organization. For other programs, including most undergraduate degree programs in the liberal arts and sciences, program review is a campus-based activity, initiated by campus administrators and carried out by departmental faculty as a means of monitoring program quality and identifying issues that may require college action. In both instances, an academic program review can be regarded as an audit of both qualitative and quantitative data about a particular program. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
The purpose of academic program review, according to the Association of American Colleges, should be to increase the self-awareness of faculty members and administrators about their educational practices so that they can improve the quality of teaching and learning. To some extent, of course, academic program review is, or should be, a continuous process. As faculty members teach and advise their students, they often think about the effectiveness of what they are doing. In addition, much of what they learn from their students has implications for the further development of their courses. Ideally, they will also consider the implications of what they have learned for the program as a whole and discuss those aspects with colleagues. The result is a continual fine-tuning of courses and modification of the program whenever the evidence suggests that such modification is needed. This policy is intended to supplement this ongoing process by encouraging formal, systematic reviews of all academic programs on a regular basis. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
3.2 Statement of the Board of Trustees
The Board of Trustees recognizes that many individual University colleges have a history of conducting academic program reviews. Among these campuses there is wide agreement that this activity should involve (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E):
a) Substantial input from the program’s faculty in preparing a self-study
b) A review and report prepared by external professional peers
c) A shared faculty and administrative responsibility in the college’s response to the self-study and the external review, and in making future plans for the program
The Council of Presidents and the University Faculty Senate also endorse these elements of academic program review. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
This University-wide policy has been prepared pursuant to Board of Trustees policy and takes into account the review practices existing at many University colleges, as well as ideas developed by the Council of Presidents and the University Faculty Senate. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
3.3 Responsibility for Guidelines
All academic programs shall be subject to a formal, periodic review procedure, including both self-study and external assessment, to be conducted in accordance with guidelines for academic program review to be established by the Chancellor after consultation with appropriate groups and governance bodies and with the approval of the Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research and the Board of Trustees. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
3.4 Responsibility for Procedures
Consistent with the provisions of the guidelines established by the Chancellor, each college shall develop procedures for the formal, periodic review of academic departments and/or programs, under the leadership of the college president and in accordance with the college governance plan. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
3.5 Frequency of Reviews
Each college should periodically conduct full reviews of all academic departments, programs, and/or clusters of departments and/or programs. These reviews may occur with whatever frequency the college chooses, but should occur at least every ten years. The only exception to this requirement—at the discretion of the presidents—shall be those departments, programs, and clusters, that are subject to formal specific program reviews by a professional accreditation body. In both cases, it would be the college’s responsibility to establish a schedule, as of the effective date of the guidelines established by the Chancellor, that ensures the regular frequency of reviews for all academic departments, programs, and clusters and, where desired, of all major academic support services. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
3.6 Programmatic Self-Study
The guidelines established by the Chancellor should be designed to produce a self-study that (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E):
a) Encourages members of a department to analyze its curriculum in relation to the goals of the department, the college, and the University
b) Investigates the effectiveness of its curriculum in relation to the desired outcomes as perceived by students, alumni, faculty members, and, where appropriate, to the review of the program by professions, industries, and employers
c) Reviews various characteristics to determine strengths and weaknesses
d) Considers needed changes
e) Evaluates the current levels of resources required for the ongoing program
f) Suggests needed changes in the program, departmental organization, and resources
College procedures may allow for the use of alternative formats to achieve the above; however, all self-studies should include the following elements (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E):
a) Discussion of the goals of the program in relation to the mission of the department, college, and University, as well as the perceptions and expectations of students
b) Description of the curriculum, including introductory, major, and elective courses, as well as articulation and collaboration with other programs
c) Discussion of measures of program activity in such areas as courses and sections offered and enrollments
d) Discussion of measures of faculty activities in such areas as teaching, research, and professional service
e) Discussion of the design and delivery of instruction
f) Discussion of measures of resources in such areas as operating budgets, faculty, facilities, and equipment
g) Discussion of measures of program results in such areas as retention, degrees awarded, and post-graduation experiences of students
h) Discussion of program quality as reflected in such measures as student course evaluations, external recognition of the program, faculty, and students, and surveys of the alumni
i) Discussion of a plan for the future to include such topics as curriculum development, faculty recruitment, retention, and development, and facilities and equipment development
3.7 External Review
Each formal, periodic academic program review should include a site visit, resulting in a written report, conducted by a team of external peers in the discipline, cluster, or program area. This team should be selected from appropriate institutions and professional organizations. In specific instances, and for good reason, a college president may request a waiver of the requirement of a site visit through the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
3.8 Plan of Action
Each college should make provision for a plan of action to be developed in response to the periodic reviews. For example, at the departmental level, the faculty members might prepare written responses to the report of the external peers, correcting factual inaccuracies and responding in detail to the recommendations of the external committee. At the college level, this plan of action might include written responses to the self-study and external report, as well as the preparation—based on the external report and the program’s response—of an academic plan for the program, with a proposed timetable, prepared by the college’s chief academic officer in consultation with the appropriate faculty, chairperson, and deans. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)
3.9 Reporting of Reviews to the Board of Trustees
The Chancellor shall report regularly to the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program and Research regarding these reviews. (BTM,1993,06-28,005,_A)
Consistent with this, each college president should inform the Chancellor of the programs reviewed each year and also forward to the Board of Trustees, through the Chancellor, a statement summarizing the major points of the self-studies, the college’s plans of action, and the external review reports. Upon request, these documents will be forwarded to the Chancellor. (BTM,1994,05-31,006,_E)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.07 Admission to the Baccalaureate Degree Programs :

Policy 1.07 Admission to Baccalaureate Degree Programs
No student who has not passed all three Freshman Skills Assessment Tests, and any other admissions criteria that may exist, shall be allowed to enroll and/or transfer into that college’s baccalaureate degree programs. Students seeking admission to The City University of New York senior college baccalaureate degree programs who are in need of remediation shall be able to obtain such remediation services at a the University community college, at a senior college only during its summer sessions, or elsewhere as may be made available. This resolution does not apply to English as a Second Language (ESL) students who received a secondary education abroad and who otherwise are not in need of remediation. (BTM,1999,01-25,009,__)
Following review of a college’s mission, resources, and student performance, and in accordance with traditional campus governance procedures, a senior college president may propose, and the Chancellor may approve, admission criteria that admit students to baccalaureate level degree programs. (BTM,1998,03-23,005,_A)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.071 Advanced Placement :

Policy 1.071 Advanced Placement
The Board of Trustees hereby adopts a policy that all undergraduate colleges at the University may grant course credit for advanced placement courses offered in secondary schools provided the student scores 3 or above on the advanced placement test effective June 26, 2017.

This resolution supersedes the February 25, 2013 resolution on AP placement, is applicable to all students entering CUNY in Fall 2017, and may be applied on a case-by-case basis to any currently enrolled student. (Board of Trustees Minutes,2013,02-25,4,_D; Superceded by: Board of Trustees Minutes,2017,06-26,6,_M)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.08 Care and Treatment of Laboratory Animals :

Policy 1.08 Care and Treatment of Laboratory Animals
1 Purpose
To assure that laboratory animals used in research activities receive appropriate care and humane treatment through (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C):
a) The establishment of programs, standards and procedures that meet United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (DHEW) requirements with regard to laboratory animal management, laboratory animal health, veterinary care and physical plant
b) The establishment of a committee with the responsibility to evaluate and report on the maintenance of acceptable programs and standards for the care, use and treatment of laboratory animals
2 Applicability
The provisions of this policy apply to all units of The City University of New York that use or intend to use laboratory animals in any type of research activity. Principal investigators and project directors are primarily responsible for observing the provisions of this policy. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
3 Background
Both the USDA and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have authority to establish standards and criteria for the care and use of laboratory animals used in research. The pertinent regulations are set forth in the following documents (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C):
a) 7 USCA 2131-2155 (The Animal Welfare Act of 1970). This statute requires annual registration of all research facilities using laboratory animals. The Research Foundation of the City University of New York (Research Foundation) is registered with the USDA under this provision, Regulation No. 21-142. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
b) “Guide for the Care and Use of Animals” (DHEW Publication No. (NIH) 78-23, revised 1978.) This publication establishes guidelines to assist institutions in using and caring for laboratory animals in ways judged to be professionally appropriate. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
c) National Institutes of Health Policy, “Responsibility for Care and Use of Animals,” NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Vol. 7, No. 17, 19 November 1978. This policy defines the institutions’ responsibility for humane care and use of animals under NIH grants and contracts. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
4 Statement of the Board of Trustees
The University and the Research Foundation are jointly committed to the principle that laboratory animals used in any experiment, research, or training project will receive appropriate care and humane treatment. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
Research objectives, personnel involved in the research, methods of care, and physical facilities, must conform to the standards and criteria prescribed in the regulations and guidelines identified in this policy, and any future revisions thereof. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
The University Committee on Laboratory Animal Care will develop programs of adequate veterinary care, evaluate adherence to prescribed standards and criteria, and review University facilities and procedures for the care and use of animals. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
5 Roles and Responsibilities
The criteria, standards, and other requirements prescribed in those documents listed in this policy, must be adhered to in all research activities covered by the provisions of this Policy. The most comprehensive guidelines are set forth in the DHEW “Guide” and all project directors, principal investigators, animal care personnel, and members of the University Committee should be thoroughly familiar with the standards established in this “Guide.” (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
The major areas of responsibility and required action are outlined below. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
5.1 Principal Investigator
Pre-proposal: The principal investigator should become familiar with the criteria and standards appropriate to the type of animals he or she intends to use, and how they are to be used in the proposed project. The principal investigator should then determine the availability of personnel and facilities required. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
Proposal: The proposal and budget should include provision for equipment or modification of available facilities, supplies, personnel, acquisition of animals, etc., required for the research. If the funding agency is to be the DHEW, the grant application or contract proposal shall indicate that animals are involved in the proposed research and should state the rationale for using animals. Information should be provided to confirm that the species and numbers of animals are appropriate, that unnecessary discomfort and injury to animals will be avoided, and that analgesic, anesthetic, and tranquilizing drugs will be used where indicated to minimize stress to the animals. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
Project Execution: The principal investigator has primary responsibility for meeting applicable standards for acquisition, care, treatment and disposition of his or her laboratory animals. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
5.2 College Administration
For those college students currently using or intending to use laboratory animals, the college president shall assign a qualified individual to coordinate the college’s activities involving care and treatment of laboratory animals. His or her primary responsibilities should be to (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C):
a) Review for the college the adequacy of available or planned facilities for research proposals involving use of animals
b) Maintain contact with the University Committee on matters involving compliance with policy
c) Maintain records and provide information necessary for annual or periodic reports as required by the Committee or by the Research Foundation
d) Disseminate information appropriate to the humane care of laboratory animals
e) Develop programs of adequate housing and care for the laboratory animals
f) Perform other functions as recommended by the Committee
It is the obligation of the college administration to ensure that professional and technical personnel who carry out animal anesthesia, surgery, or other experimental manipulations, be qualified through training and experience to accomplish these tasks in a humane and scientifically acceptable manner. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
When the College receives formal notification of an award involving the use of laboratory animals, the grants officer should send the college’s coordinator of animal care a copy of the approved proposal and budget. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
5.3 Committee on Laboratory Animal Care
There shall be established within the University a Committee on Laboratory Animal Care. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
The Committee shall be composed of at least five members appointed by the Chancellor, whose appointments shall continue until terminated by the Chancellor. At least four members shall be qualified faculty representatives of the colleges making the most extensive use of laboratory animals, and one member shall be a qualified Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. The faculty representatives must be knowledgeable regarding the care and use of animals in research. Staff assistance for the Committee will be furnished by the Research Foundation. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
Responsibilities of the Committee shall include the following (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C):
a) Evaluation of the animal care program in regard to the maintenance of acceptable standards for the care, use, and treatment of animals in research. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
b) At least once each year, inspection and evaluation of animal care facilities, personnel, and methods at each unit of the University that uses laboratory animals, and submission of any recommendations to the appropriate college. NIH policy requires annual inspection by the Committee of facilities and procedures. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
c) Maintenance of records of committee activities, recommendations, and determinations. These records will be available for inspection by the Director of NIH or his or her authorized representatives. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
d) Review of proposals submitted by principal investigators where there is a question of adherence to policy, adequacy of facilities, or appropriateness of research protocol. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
e) Furnishing of assistance and guidance to the colleges and project directors on their facilities and procedures, providing interpretations of USDA, DHEW, University and Research Foundation policies, and of any relevant legal requirements. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)
f) Maintenance of liaison with DHEW and other relevant agencies, advising the College administration and project directors of the prevailing regulatory environment, and submitting recommendations to the University and the Research Foundation. (BTM,1980,06-23,005,_C)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.09 Centers, Institutes, Consortia, and Special Initiatives :

Policy 1.09 Centers, Institutes, Consortia, and Special Initiatives
In The City University of New York, as in most institutions of higher education, the normal locus for instruction and research is the academic department. Additional instruction is delivered through the University’s continuing education programs. At the same time, the University benefits greatly from the activities of centers, institutes, consortia, and special initiatives. These play an important role in the University’s endeavors by meeting needs that fall outside the customary domains of academic departments. Since these organized research, instruction, and training initiatives, do not operate under the established rules and regulations that govern departments, it is desirable and even necessary to set policies to provide for their orderly administration. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
Centers, institutes, consortia, and special initiatives, should supplement, not supplant, activities of academic and administrative departments. Consequently, these entities are prohibited from duplicating functions of, or exercising routine prerogatives of, academic and administrative departments. In particular, they are not to be viewed as alternate routes to faculty appointment. Specifically, they are explicitly debarred from (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B):
a) Offering regular courses
b) Conferring degrees
c) Appointing faculty members through their agency alone, or without adequate faculty consultation
d) Conferring tenure or providing certificates of continuous employment
e) Acquiring capital equipment not inventoried to an academic or administrative department
f) Negotiating legal contracts on their own authority
Organized research, training and instruction, and service units, are expected to operate with substantial external support to advance the mission of the University beyond what is possible to accomplish through the basic institutional budget. While tax-levy support for centers and institutes is not prohibited, it should be viewed as an aid to developing external support and never as a guarantee. Tax-levy support may be provided by either a college or by the University as outlined in this policy. Historically, tax-levy support from the University has been provided from organized research funds. Tax-levy support from the University is usually, but not always, limited in duration and extent. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
Centers, institutes, consortia, and other special initiatives, carry out their diverse missions in a multitude of ways. Funding comes from the federal, State, and City governments, and from private foundations. Detailed and rigorous rules applicable to all centers and institutes are not feasible. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
Recognizing that the terms ‘center’ and ‘institute’ are used by many inside and outside the University to denote a variety of entities, this policy distinguishes between the title by which an entity is known and its designation by the Board of Trustees for the purposes of this policy. For the purposes of this policy a center is a single campus entity, an institute or consortium is a multi-campus entity. An institute has a primary campus and a consortium is governed by a board, subject, like all units of the University, to the authority of the Board of Trustees. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
A center, institute, consortium, or special initiative of the University is an organizational entity other than an academic, continuing education, or administrative department, conducting research, instruction, training, service, or other activity, which—by its nature, methods of operation, or sources of funding—requires recognition as an entity outside regular structures. The purposes of such entities may be described as follows (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B):
g) Research: Centers, institutes, and consortia are vehicles for interdisciplinary research, thematic research that unites sub-disciplines within an academic discipline, or special projects of limited duration. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
h) Training and Instruction: Groups whose educations do not fall within the academic curriculum or continuing education programs of the University and is not applicable towards a degree can be brought together in campus-based centers or University-wide institutes that offer non-credit instruction more narrowly focused or of shorter duration than the customary curriculum. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
i) Service to the Surrounding Community: It is appropriate for the University or a campus to offer non-instructional services to the outside community based on its expertise in academic disciplines. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
Regardless of its actual title, each such entity must be formally designated as one of the following mutually exclusive types and follow approval, financing, and accountability policy, for that designation. The Office of Academic Affairs will maintain a current list of all approved entities with their formal designation and will publish such a list to the University community every two years. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
2 Definitions
2.1 Centers
A center is an organized unit of a single college of the University whose mission is to sponsor, coordinate, and promote, research, training, instruction, or service. Centers should not duplicate or substantially compete with the mission of University-wide institutes, consortia, or special initiatives. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
2.2 Institutes
An institute is an organized unit staffed, supported, and governed by several colleges of the University under the leadership of a primary campus whose mission is to sponsor, coordinate, and promote research, training and instruction, and service, to enhance by collaboration the University’s strength in specific areas. New institutes should not duplicate, substantially overlap with, or subsume the mission of existing institutes, consortia, or special initiatives. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
2.3 Consortia
A consortium is an organized unit of the University formed by several campuses, institutes and/or centers, whose mission is to coordinate the efforts of its individual components and in which no single component leads. New consortia should not duplicate, substantially overlap, or subsume the mission of existing institutes, consortia, or special initiatives. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
2.4 Special Initiatives
Occasionally, the University has a special opportunity or is specially requested to serve the city, state, or nation, in projects that do not fall within any of the above categories. the University may then initiate an activity it hopes will grow into a center or institute of the types defined in this policy or which may remain limited in duration and scope. Such projects are called University special initiatives, and—while their form and function cannot be fully anticipated in sufficient detail to provide specific regulations for their conduct—by recognizing the possibility of these endeavors in this policy the Board of Trustees of the University indicates, in general terms, its support of special initiatives and affirms the legitimacy of their role in University affairs. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
3 Approval Processes
3.1 Centers
Each college shall follow any applicable local approval process for creation of new centers consistent with its established governance plan. The process should include a recommendation from the college governance body. The college shall inform the Office of Academic Affairs of the intention to create new centers. After the Office of Academic Affairs has reviewed proposed centers for conformity with this policy, the college will place an item in the special actions section of the University Report, and the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs will present the new center to the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research as an information item. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
3.2 Institutes
A proposal to create a new institute at the University requires approvals at the campus, University, and Trustee levels. Participating colleges will determine the process by which individual campus approval is granted, but the process should include approval of the college’s governance bodies and substantial consultation with faculty. At the University and Trustee levels, the process will consist of the following elements (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B):
a) The participating colleges will provide to the Office of Academic Affairs a proposal that incorporates (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B):
(i) A governance plan for the proposed institute, including designation of a primary campus and the basis for participation by other campuses, as well as the structure of the governing board and steering committee
(ii) A funding plan for the institute
(iii) A justification for the creation of the institute—including local, regional, and national significance of the contributions the institute is intended to make—as well as its relationship, if any, to existing centers and institutes at the University and within the City and State of New York
(iv) Assurance that the institute does not duplicate, substantially overlap, or subsume the mission of existing institutes, consortia, or special initiatives except when the explicit purpose of establishing the institute is to replace existing structures
(v) A staffing plan for the institute including an organizational chart, curriculum vitae of proposed staff members, and letters of endorsement from individuals and organizations outside the University
b) The Office of Academic Affairs will review the proposal and make recommendations to the Chancellor on the approval or disapproval of the proposed institute. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
c) Institutes receiving the approval of the Chancellor will be transmitted to the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research for review and approval. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
d) Institutes receiving the approval of this Board of Trustees committee will be submitted to the full Board of Trustees for its review and approval. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
3.3 Consortia
A proposal to establish a new consortium at the University will require approvals at the University and Trustee levels. The process will consist of the following elements (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B):
a) The participating campuses will provide to the Office of Academic Affairs a proposal incorporating (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B):
(i) The governance plan of the proposed consortium, including the membership and structure of the governing board
(ii) A funding plan for the consortium
(iii) A justification for the establishment of the consortium—including local, regional, and national significance of the contributions the consortium is intended to make—as well as its relationship to existing institutes and centers at the University and within the City and State of New York
(iv) Assurance that the proposed consortium does not duplicate, substantially overlap, or subsume the mission of an existing institute, consortium, or special initiative
(v) A staffing plan for the consortium, including an organizational chart, curriculum vitae of proposed staff members, and letters of endorsement from individuals and organizations outside the University
b) The Office of Academic Affairs will review the proposal and make recommendations to the Chancellor on the approval or disapproval of the proposed consortium. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
c) Consortia receiving the approval of the Chancellor will be transmitted to the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research for review and approval. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
d) Consortia receiving the approval of the Board of Trustees committee will be submitted to the full Board of Trustees for its review and approval. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
3.4 Special Initiatives
Since the exact form of special initiatives cannot be anticipated, it shall be left to the Chancellor to bring them to the attention of the Board of Trustees in a manner appropriate to their structure, function, and financial requirements. However, since the structure of special initiatives is not specified in advance, it is important that special care be taken to ensure that special initiatives adhere strictly to the limitations made explicit in this policy. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
4 Financing
4.1 Centers
Centers, as campus-based entities will generally be funded through a combination of external sponsored program funds and campus-based support. It is University policy that tax-levy support for centers should be limited in extent and duration so that it does not constitute a burden on the instructional budget of campuses. While occasional central tax-levy support for campus-based centers is allowed, as a rule, campuses should expect to support centers within their own budgets and from sponsored programs. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
4.2 Institutes and Consortia
Given the anticipated scale of their operations and the magnitude of the institutional commitments they carry, institutes and consortia are appropriate loci for major investments of tax-levy monies. the University does not place rigid limits on the dollar amounts of tax-levy support allocated to an institute or a consortium or prescribe precise matching requirements, but it does expect that over time tax-levy support will be matched by substantial amounts of non-tax-levy monies and that, whenever feasible, institutes and consortia will make vigorous efforts to become fiscally self-sufficient. Proposals for the creation of new institutes or consortia shall include in their documentation a fiscal plan indicating the need for matching funds and a timetable for attaining all funding goals. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
5 Accountability
5.1 Centers
Accountability for centers will be assigned to campuses. The Office of Academic Affairs should be provided with an up-to-date listing of all centers once every two years for inclusion in the Chancellor’s Report. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
5.2 Institutes and Consortia
At the end of every other fiscal year, the colleges (for institutes), and the boards of directors (for consortia), shall submit to the Office of Academic Affairs, for informational purposes, a report from each institute and consortium. The report shall contain (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B):
a) The director’s statement of the institute’s or consortium’s current progress toward meeting its goals
b) The institute’s or consortium’s staffing
c) A description of current and projected activities
d) A current and projected budget including individual project budgets, a tax-levy budget showing expenditures of these funds, and a chart indicating the sources of staff and faculty salaries
If, on the basis of the report submitted, questions arise concerning the viability, governance, or mandate, of a specific institute or consortium, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs will seek clarification from the president of the appropriate college (for institutes) or the board of directors (for consortia). The report on the institute or the consortium, together with any supplementary materials, will be submitted to the Chancellor for review and appropriate action. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
On the basis of the institutes’ and consortia’s reports, the Office of Academic Affairs shall prepare and submit to the Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research, for informational purposes every other year, a report on research and training institutes and consortia, which will also include a listing of new, continued, and terminated institutes and consortia. The listing shall be included in the Chancellor’s Report for informational purposes. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
5.3 Special Initiatives
The Chancellor shall, from time to time, as deemed appropriate or at the request of the Board of Trustees, report to the Board of Trustees on the status and progress of special initiatives. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
6 Evaluation
6.1 Centers
Centers shall be evaluated at least every ten years through a campus-based process. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)
6.2 Institutes and Consortia
Institutes and consortia shall be evaluated every five years. the University will assess the success of the institute or consortium in meeting its stated goals, including the effectiveness of the institute or consortium as a University-wide entity. The presidents of institutes and boards of directors of consortia shall coordinate the evaluation process. The evaluation shall include a self-evaluation report and a report by at least two outside evaluators along with a summary of financial support and progress toward fiscal self-sufficiency, which shall be given substantial weight in the evaluation. Failure to achieve reasonable progress toward an appropriate level of non-tax-levy support will constitute sufficient cause for discontinuing University-level support of an institute or consortium. Evaluation reports shall be submitted to the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, which shall prepare a summary of the evaluations and submit it to the Chancellor for review and appropriate action. Recommendations for discontinuation of unsatisfactory institutes and consortia shall go to the Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research, and to the full Board of Trustees for action. (BTM,1995,02-27,005,_B)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.10 City University Baccalaureate Degree :

Policy 1.10 City University Baccalaureate Degree
The City University of New York is authorized to award the Bachelor of Arts Degree and Bachelor of Science Degree in accordance with recommendations made by a special committee of faculty, students and administrators known as the Committee on the City University Baccalaureate Degree. (BTM,1971,02-22,023,_C)
The degree shall be awarded in accordance with recommendations made by this committee.. (BTM,1971,02-22,023,_C)
A community college student in the University Baccalaureate Program will have the following options (BTM,1971,12-20,005,_H):
a) He or she may elect, in fulfilling the University Baccalaureate requirements, to achieve an associate degree as awarded by a community college in the University. Upon receiving the Associate Degree, he or she shall be automatically matriculated into a senior college of his or her choice for the purpose of completing the University Baccalaureate. (BTM,1971,12-20,005,_H)
b) He or she may elect to proceed directly to the University Baccalaureate degree without achieving an associate degree. Such student, upon the certification of his or her Faculty Committee that he or she has earned sixty credits in good standing, shall automatically be matriculated into a senior college of his or her choice for the purpose of completing the University Baccalaureate degree. (BTM,1971,12-20,005,_H)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.11 Collaboration with Other Educational Institutions :

Policy 1.11 Collaboration with Other Educational Institutions
All future programs between the colleges, whether individually or collectively, and a non–City University of New York institution, are to be submitted first to the Office of Academic Affairs for review and approval and subsequently to the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research and the full Board of Trustees for the approval of these bodies. (BTM,1984,05-29,006,_B)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.12 College Discovery :

Policy 1.12 College Discovery
1 Purposes and Objectives
The overall mission of the College Discovery Program is to provide college support services to academically and economically disadvantaged students in order to enhance their opportunity for a higher education, and to increase the level of education, social mobility, and vocational capability in our City and State. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In fulfilling this general mission, College Discovery has the following purposes and objectives (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Provide at each community college, through special funding, a permanent and structured program of comprehensive support services to selected students with specifically defined educational and economic needs to aid them in achieving a quality college education and expanded career options
b) Provide, through special program funding, a range of support services:
(i) Comprehensive counseling
(ii) Orientation courses
(iii) Integrated tutoring
c) Provide, through the resources of the college, basic skills in conjunction with tutorial services
d) Provide, through the resources of the University, summer and intersession programs
e) Promote coordination and articulation between the College Discovery and Development Program in the high schools and the College Discovery Program at the community colleges
f) Promote the advancement of College Discovery graduates into baccalaureate and upper division programs in the senior colleges through the SEEK Program
g) Promote understanding among the faculty and administration of each community college with respect to the purposes set forth in this policy and acceptance of this policy as being central to the mission of the University
2 Definitions
2.1 College Discovery Program
The College Discovery Program is to be considered, and is hereby defined as, one of the major programs of the University and of each of its community colleges. The College Discovery Program is hereby defined as the totality of the University’s activities and involvement with those students admitted as College Discovery students, including the process of recruitment, selection, admission, orientation, advisement, counseling, tutoring, financial assistance, remedial, developmental and compensatory instruction, and regular instruction from admission to graduation. With final responsibility vested in the Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the Presidents, subject to the terms and provisions of this policy, the college administrations, faculties and staff, the campus College Discovery Programs, and the Office of Special Programs in the University’s Office of Academic Affairs, shall each, as appropriate, be considered responsible and accountable for the operation and administration of the Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The special aspects and components of the College Discovery Program shall consist of the following (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Counseling and advisement services in the course of admitting students
b) Special diagnostic testing, tutoring, counseling, and advisement services for enrolled students
c) Intensive remediation in basic skills, developmental and compensatory courses, and summer classes for such students
d) Necessary supplementary financial assistance, including the cost of books and necessary maintenance in accordance with criteria and guidelines promulgated by the University and approved by appropriate external authorities
e) Administration, accounting, research, monitoring and evaluation services provided by the University’s Office of Special Programs
2.2 The College Discovery Program (College Unit)
The College Discovery Program is the academic and administrative unit on each community college campus responsible for the operation and conduct of particular components of the College Discovery Program: counseling services, orientation courses for entering program students and the College Discovery Component of the University Skills Immersion Program. It is also the unit responsible for monitoring instruction, tutoring, and summer programs, for College Discovery students, in cooperation with other college administrative offices, in a manner to be specifically described in the Academic and Fiscal Accountability Plans of each college. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.3 Budget
The College Discovery budget is that portion of the University budget that consists of special funds provided under the terms of the State’s Higher Education Opportunity Act, and other funds provided through the community college budget for the special functions and purposes described in the Act and in other relevant local legislation. These consist of funds for counseling, tutoring, and student stipends. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.4 Program Student Status
College Discovery students are, and must be, full-time students, with full-time status defined as a minimum course load of at least twelve credits/equated credits, or whatever is considered equivalent at community colleges using other than a standard semester calendar. The combination of credits/equated credits must conform to Federal and State guidelines for full-time status. All College Discovery students must be matriculated in a degree program from the time of their first enrollment. Under extenuating circumstances, College Discovery students may obtain part-time status. Students attending part-time must enroll for at least six semester hours or the equivalent per term, except for graduating seniors. Part-time status is granted for one semester and can only be extended by a waiver granted by the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.5 Developmental Education
Developmental education services for College Discovery Program students shall be defined as those instructional activities designed to facilitate the development of basic skills and basic academic knowledge and disciplines required to build a bridge between pre-college capability and successful performance in college-level academic course work. Remediation is to be defined as the phase focused on the acquisition of the basic skills in reading, writing, mathematics and speech. In deve1opmental courses, primary emphasis shall be given to the development of comprehensive basic verbal, reading, writing and mathematical skills. Developmental education may include, but need not be limited to, structured courses, workshops, seminars, and study labs, among other pedagogic approaches. Academic credit shall be given only to the extent that college level material is integrated into such instructional modalities as courses, seminars and workshops. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The total number of credits toward graduation to be awarded to any student for any number or combination of the above-defined courses shall be determined by each community college. These courses shall be provided by the appropriate departments of the college. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.6 Compensatory Courses
Compensatory courses are all non-remedial credit-bearing courses that have compensatory excess hours attached. Compensatory excess hours are all contact hours of a remedial nature in excess of the course credit weight attached to a non-remedial course. For FTE computation, credits assigned to courses are counted as credits, and excess hours in compensatory courses are counted as equated credits. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.7 Tutoring
Tutoring is the provision of supplementary instruction at all levels and in all courses for College Discovery Program students requiring such assistance. Tutoring shall be provided on a regular basis to College Discovery Program students with deficiencies in skills or those who lack the appropriate academic background for essential course work. Tutoring shall be provided by tutors recommended by instructors of the pertinent subject and certified by the chairperson of the appropriate department or by his or her designee(s) as qualified to tutor in the subject. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.8 Counseling
Counseling is the provision of academic, personal, financial, and other support related services by professionally trained counseling personnel. Counseling shall be concentrated on the maximization of the academic potential, performance, and progress of the College Discovery student. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.9 Financial Aid
Student financial assistance is the provision of necessary financial support, to the extent possible, to enable the economically disadvantaged student to attend college on a full-time basis. The primary responsibility for the packaging and awarding of financial aid to College Discovery students shall be vested in the College Financial Aid Office. The College Discovery Program shall perform liaison functions, College Discovery student advocacy, and shall coordinate functions with regard to the financial aid of individual students and the interpretation of policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
3 College Plans
Each community college President shall annually submit to the Chancellor, through the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, two college plans covering the College Discovery Program for the ensuing year, a college Academic Plan and a college Fiscal Accountability Plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Among the major objectives of these required college plans are to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Ensure that the common purposes of the Program are served and the objectives of each individual plan can be monitored and evaluated
b) Encourage innovative educational approaches that address the needs of the educationally disadvantaged
c) Permit, within the framework of relevant education law and this policy, justified diversity and flexibility in organization and structure arising from the differences among the community colleges
The plans shall contain a precise description of both administrative and academic management for the Program in budgetary, personnel, and management terms. The plans shall include provisions for the College Discovery Component of the University Skills Immersion Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
These college plans shall be in a form and contain such detailed elements as shall be outlined by the Chancellor. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The preparation of these college plans shall be the direct responsibility of the president. The plans shall be submitted in accordance with a timetable provided by the Chancellor through the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs.
The two plans are to contain the following items. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
3.1 Academic Plan
The college Academic Plan shall cover the provision of all components of the College Discovery Program as defined in this policy, as well as the remedial, developmental, compensatory and regular instruction provided to College Discovery students by the college. It shall also reflect the provisions of the New York State Higher Education Opportunity Program Act, appropriate budget requirements, and policies promulgated by and through the University. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
3.2 Fiscal Accountability Plan
The college Fiscal Accountability Plan shall describe the system at the college for receiving, disbursing, and reporting on the use of College Discovery funds, in accordance with legal requirements, City and State Budget and audit requirements, and the requirements of this policy. It shall also report the payroll titles, salaries, and functional titles and duties, of current staff and those proposed for the upcoming year. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Chancellor, through the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, may accept the plans, or require modifications based on the legal requirements of external authorities or the requirements of this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
These plans, upon approval by the Chancellor, shall be reported to the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Affairs through the University’s General Plan for the Special Programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
4 Academic Plan
As prescribed in content and form by the Chancellor, each community college President shall submit to the Chancellor, through the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, an Academic Plan that contains the elements outlined in this policy. The Plan shall also include provision for the summer session offerings referred to in this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Since the prime objective of this policy is to promote the improvement of educational outcomes for College Discovery Program students, it is required that each Academic Plan approved by the Chancellor contain a description not only of the special courses to be offered but also a statement of their articulation with relevant regular college course offerings and a specification of all programmatic services defined in this policy, such as compensatory education and tutoring and the mode of their offering and availability. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In summary, the Plan shall (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Detail the specific academic goals of the particular College Discovery Program at the college and the means to be used to achieve them
b) Describe the educational content of the Program
c) Contain provision for a sufficient number of quantifiable indicators of student achievement to facilitate evaluation
A description of remedial, developmental, and compensatory course offerings, provided to College Discovery students by the college shall be included in the Academic Plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
A description of the College Discovery Component of the University Skills Immersion Program and any special summer school offerings in basic skills, and in developmental and compensatory courses and programs shall also be included in the Academic Plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall describe tutoring and counseling services that are provided to College Discovery students from the time of their admission to graduation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall describe procedures for the monitoring of compulsory attendance of College Discovery students in basic skills courses as established by Board of Trustees resolution and required by this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan may include proposals for deviations from this policy. Any such proposed deviations shall be clearly identified, described in detail, and defined as experimental in nature, with the length of the experimental period specified. Each such proposal shall also contain provision for suitable evaluation mechanisms and an adequate description of the expected results of the experimental deviation or program innovation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan, by use of the University’s Skills Assessment Program and other appropriate measures, shall identify improvement in the academic capabilities and achievements of College Discovery Program students. Such academic progress indicators shall be used for the evaluation of programmatic success on each campus. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall contain provision for the monitoring of the academic components and the fiscal aspects of the Program that are conducted by the College Discovery Program Director, as appropriate, as well as those that are conducted by pertinent academic and administrative authorities. The following components shall be monitored (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) College Discovery funded components that are under the direct administration of the Program Director (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
(i) Administration
(ii) Counseling
(iii) Freshmen orientation courses
(iv) The College Discovery Component of the University Skills Immersion Program
b) Those College Discovery funded components that are administered through other college offices (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
(i) Tutoring services
(ii) Financial assistance services
c) Those components funded through the community college budget and provided to all students by departments of the college (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
(i) Remedial courses
(ii) Compensatory courses
The Plan shall be subject to review and approval, and to subsequent monitoring and evaluation, by the Chancellor, through the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, in cooperation with the Vice Chancellor for Budget and Finance. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
5 Fiscal Accountability Plan
As prescribed in content and form by the Chancellor, each community college president shall submit to the Chancellor a Fiscal Accountability Plan containing the elements outlined in this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Fiscal Accountability Plan shall describe the projected pattern of expenditures for the College Discovery Program, including the projected percentage of College Discovery Program and college funds to be allocated to each of the support services, and the projected means of tracking such expenditures. The projected pattern of expenditures of College Discovery and non-College Discovery funds shall include, but not be limited to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Academic credit instructional costs
b) Other instructional costs
c) Remediation
d) Counseling
e) Supplemental financial assistance
f) Research and evaluation
g) Administrative costs (including financial aid personnel)
h) Tutoring
i) College Discovery Summer Program Component of the University Skills Immersion Program
j) Intersession Program costs
If it is proposed that the College Discovery Program and other college program activities be combined in particular courses or programs, the Plan shall specify the exact extent, for funding purposes, of the participation of College Discovery Program students or faculty in the combined activities. Any exchange of funds and/or services must be in consultation with, and approved by, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee and the campus College Discovery Program Director. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall include information on projected exchanges of either funds or services. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall contain provision for monitoring the fiscal aspects of the Program by the College Discovery Program Director, as appropriate, as well as by pertinent fiscal and administrative authorities. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall be subject to review and approval, as well as to subsequent monitoring and evaluation, by the Chancellor through the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs in cooperation with the Vice Chancellor for Budget and Finance. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
6 Monitoring, Reporting, and Evaluation
It shall be the president’s responsibility in each college to monitor the implementation, application, and enforcement of this policy, and of that college’s approved Academic Plan and Fiscal Accountability Plan. He or she shall take whatever steps are necessary to fulfill this responsibility, including such delegations of responsibility as he or she deems necessary, and shall submit reports on the same to the Chancellor, the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs, and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research, as part of the periodic reports referred to below. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The College Discovery Director shall be generally responsible for monitoring and reporting to the President, from the perspective of the College Discovery Program, on the implementation of this policy, and specifically on the academic progress of all College Discovery students and their receipt of all college and College Discovery Program funded services for which these students are eligible. The Academic Plan, along with the Fiscal Accountability Plan, shall specify the means whereby these monitoring responsibilities are to be discharged. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The results of such monitoring shall be reported to the Chancellor who shall periodically forward such reports to the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research. It shall be the responsibility of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, at the direction of the Chancellor, to see that the necessary reporting and monitoring are carried out on each campus. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
These reports shall focus on the implementation of the Academic Plan and the Fiscal Accountability Plan. They may also include data required for inclusion in the State mandated annual Final Report, such as (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Credit accumulation
b) Grade point averages
c) Rate of movement of College Discovery Program students into the second and possible third year of their programs
d) Rate of disbursement of College Discovery Program funds in the various functional categories
The president shall include in a covering statement his or her own assessment of the progress being made toward the realization of the purposes and objectives of the Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7 Structure and Administration at the Campus Level
7.1 Components of the Program
There shall be a College Discovery Program at each of the community colleges. The Program, which shall be the overall responsibility of the President, faculty and staff of the college, shall include the following components (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Remedial and developmental instruction in reading, writing, speech, English and mathematics provided by appropriate departments of the college
b) A semester-length orientation course for entering program students
c) A College Discovery Program Component of the University Skills Immersion Program
d) Intersession classes
e) Special tutoring
f) Comprehensive counseling and advisement services
g) Financial aid services performed in accordance with criteria and guidelines promulgated by the University, subject to approval by the appropriate external authorities
h) Program administration
i) Program research and evaluation
With respect to the instructional component of the Program, it is the intent of this policy that each involved college shall provide a clearly defined, specifically described, integrated, sequential curriculum designed to develop the basic skills of College Discovery students and progressively initiate these students in and prepare them for successful college level academic work. Intensive remedial and developmental instruction shall constitute the essence of such an integrated curriculum and is to be accorded the highest priority. The college shall place major emphasis on accelerating the movement of newly enrolled College Discovery students towards initiating and pursuing studies within the regular college curriculum. Compulsory attendance is mandated for College Discovery students in all remedial, developmental, and compensatory courses, for which they are registered. Comprehensive tutoring as part of, and coordinated with, intensive remedial and developmental instruction shall be provided to Program students. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.2 Unit Responsibilities
As part of the Program, each community college shall establish a College Discovery Program unit that shall be responsible for providing the following academic and support services (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Counseling, including academic, personal, career, social and financial aid counseling to be provided exclusively for all enrolled College Discovery Program students
b) A semester-long orientation course for all entering Program students
c) Liaison and coordination with the college Financial Aid Office regarding financial aid services for College Discovery Program students
d) Liaison and coordination with the appropriate departments of the college regarding their provision of basic skills instruction and tutorial services for College Discovery Program students
e) A College Discovery Summer Component of the University Skills Immersion Program
f) Liaison with the Intersession Program
7.3 Personnel and Organization
The College Discovery Program shall be an integral program of the college. The College Discovery Program budget shall provide funding for a Program Director, an assistant to the Director, counselors, and an administrative support person. All persons appointed as College Discovery counselors or administrators of the Program shall be appointed upon the recommendation of the department in which the Program is housed in accordance with the established procedures of the college. These personnel shall be assigned to work exclusively with the Program and its students. The College Discovery Program Director shall be consulted on all appointments and substitute assignments to the Program prior to such actions. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
With respect to appointment, reappointment, promotion, tenure, and certificates of continuous employment, instructional and counseling staff of the College Discovery Program, like all other University personnel, shall be subject to University provisions for classroom observation (where appropriate), student evaluation (if appropriate), and annual evaluation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Annual evaluations of College Discovery Program personnel shall be conducted in cooperation with the College Discovery Program Director. The College Discovery Program Director shall either be designated to conduct the annual evaluation of College Discovery Program personnel by the departmental Personnel and Budget Committee, or assigned input into the procedure. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.4 College Discovery Director
The Director of the College Discovery Program in each community college shall be responsible for the College Discovery Program as defined in this policy . At the discretion of the president, he or she shall be recommended for appointment by the president to a professorial level title, subject to the by-laws and procedures of the Board of Trustees of the University. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs shall report on this recommendation for appointment to the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Affairs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Such functions that the president may assign to the College Discovery Director, in addition to the primary functions specified in this policy, shall be germane and related to the primary functions and shall be described in the Academic Plan and the Fiscal Accountability Plan. In addition to the responsibility for administering the functions and services vested in the College Discovery Program, the Director shall also be responsible, under the President, in accordance with the Academic and Fiscal Accountability Plans, for monitoring all College Discovery funding, the support programs and services provided by various college departments to College Discovery students, and for the advocacy and representation of College Discovery students from admission to graduation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In recommending the appointment of a College Discovery Director to the Board of Trustees for its approval, the President shall consult with the appropriate College Discovery representatives and shall specify to the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research through the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, the methods of selection and consultation employed in the recommendation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.5 Assistant To The Director
An assistant to the College Discovery Program Director shall be appointed and employed in the College Discovery Program. The assistant shall be assigned duties by the Program Director in any of the funded areas, including oversight responsibilities in the areas of financial aid, tutoring, research, evaluation and/or fiscal management. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.6 Counselors and Counseling
Counselors shall be appointed and employed in the College Discovery Program at such a ratio of counselors to students as is funded by the City. The counselors shall provide professional counseling in academic, career, personal, financial, and social, matters, with the major objective of furthering the student’s academic potential, performance, and progress. Counselors shall consult and maintain liaison with classroom instructors, and shall be responsible for monitoring student progress and class attendance to the extent possible. A precise register of contacts between students and counselors is to be maintained by the College Discovery Program. The Academic Plan may provide the same or similar encouragement and sanctions for student participation in counseling sessions as for class attendance. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.7 Faculty Qualifications
All faculty in the College Discovery Program shall have those qualifications or professional achievement and training required of faculty members in the rank of lecturer (full-time), instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor, and be appointed through the regular channels of the college and the University. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.8 Faculty Evaluation and Review
Faculty of the College Discovery Program shall be evaluated in accordance with college and University procedures. The reviews and annual evaluations of counselors, conducted by either the College Discovery Director or the department chairperson, shall include reference to counseling effectiveness and sensitivity to the learning patterns of disadvantaged students and, where appropriate, also include reference to the academic content and substance of courses, such as the freshman orientation course that counselors may teach. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.9 Tutoring
Provision of sufficient tutoring services to Program students, from point of entry to graduation, shall be a key element of every campus College Discovery Program. A detailed description thereof, including provision for orientation and training, shall be part of each college Academic Plan, and provision for the maintenance of precise records of services shall be a part of the Fiscal Accountability Plan. The primary goal of these services shall be twofold, to provide (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) The individual academic support necessary to acquire the skills to complete required basic skills sequences
b) The supplementary instruction required to maximize student performance at all levels and in all courses through Program completion
The College Discovery Program, through its Director, shall maintain liaison between the Program and the various tutoring centers of the college to ensure the provision of tutorial services to the College Discovery population. The College Discovery Program shall establish, in cooperation with the tutoring centers, an adequate record-keeping system that will provide data for required annual reports, audits, evaluation, research and other statistical reports as are requested by appropriate bodies. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Tutoring shall be provided on a regular basis by qualified tutors. Peer tutors shall have a minimum 3.0 grade point average and shall be recommended and certified in the appropriate discipline by the pertinent academic department. In addition, a tutor shall be sensitive to the needs of College Discovery students and have the requisite interpersonal and communication skills. Tutors shall be supervised and monitored by the tutoring centers in consultation with the College Discovery Program, and precise records of the tutorial services provided by each center shall be maintained. Periodic evaluations of the results of such services shall be provided. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.10 Research and Data Collection
Subject to appropriate funding, each campus College Discovery Program shall establish a research and data collection unit housed in College Discovery, which, under the supervision of the College Discovery Director shall among its assigned functions, be available to provide the data and research requirements of the University’s Office of Special Programs. If campus College Discovery funding for a research and data collection unit is unavailable from the University or the colleges, the College Discovery Director, with the cooperation and support of other offices of the college, will be responsible for collecting the data for the College Discovery Campus Annual Report, The Academic and Fiscal Plans, and the General Plan for the Office of Special Programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8 Structure and Administration at The University Level
8.1 Board of Trustees and Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs
The Board of Trustees is ultimately responsible for the policies, programs, personnel, and funding allocations of the College Discovery Program, subject to: (a) State and local law; (b) the regulations and requirements of the Regents and the State Department of Education; and (c) the requirements of State and City Budget Offices. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The University’s Office of Special Programs has been incorporated into the Office of Academic Affairs. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs will report on Special Programs to both the University’s Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Affairs. However, the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs is responsible, at the Board of Trustees’ direction, for considering and making recommendations to the Board of Trustees on all policy matters for the College Discovery Program, under the terms of this policy and the By-laws, resolutions, and policy statements of the Board of Trustees. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.2 Chancellor
The Chancellor is responsible for the administration and operation of the College Discovery Program through the Presidents, faculties and staff of the colleges, and, in particular, for the central coordination of the Program, including the allocation and monitoring of College Discovery funding, under the direction of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.3 Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs shall be responsible, under the direction of the Chancellor, for the central coordination of the College Discovery Program, and for the discharge of such responsibilities of the University’s Office of Special Programs as are specified in this policy and assigned to him or her by the Chancellor. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The central coordination of College Discovery academic and personnel matters, budget matters, and non-academic personnel matters, shall be effected under the direction of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs in coordination and collaboration with appropriate University administrative offices, i.e., the Office of Student Development, the Office of Budget and Finance, and the Office of Faculty and Staff Relations. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.4 University Dean for Academic Affairs
The University Dean for Academic Affairs is responsible for assuring the quality of the College Discovery Program and its consistency with the mission of the University, the campuses, and the New York State Higher Education Opportunity Act. the University Dean is also responsible for the oversight of the University’s Office of Special Programs and the College Discovery Programs at the seven community colleges. Oversight includes monitoring, reporting, research and advisement on the practices, procedures and policies affecting the Programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.5 Director of the Office of Special Programs
The Director of the Office of Special Programs, under the oversight and direction of the University Dean for Academic Affairs, shall be responsible for the oversight, direction and functioning of the University’s Office of Special Programs and for the discharge of such functions as are vested in the University’s Office of Special Programs by this policy or by the direction of the Chancellor and/or the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.6 Office of Special Programs
The University’s Office of Special Programs shall be part of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and shall report to the Chancellor through him or her. the University’s Office of Special Programs shall be responsible for (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) The coordination, compilation, and preparation, of the College Discovery section of the General Plan for the Special Programs, the College Discovery Final Report, and such other reports as are required by the Chancellor, the Board of Trustees, and by external authorities. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) The coordination of the monitoring, reporting, and evaluation processes set forth in this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) The initiation and conduct of research and evaluation of the College Discovery Program directed at programmatic improvements. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
d) The coordination of campus research and data collection units, in consultation and coordination with the University’s Office of Institutional Research and Assessment under the direction of the Chancellor. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
e) The promotion of the exchange of information on research and development activities with and among the individual campuses. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
f) The provision of assistance in program planning and development as a continuous effort aimed at enhancing program quality. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
g) The promotion and conduct of University-wide training for College Discovery administrators and faculty. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
h) Other functions, duties, responsibilities, and activities as may be assigned to it by the Chancellor and/or the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.7 College Discovery Budget
The College Discovery Budget, as prepared for submission to funding authorities, shall be developed by the Office of Academic Affairs in consultation with the Presidents, and through them, with the campus College Discovery Directors and submitted to the Office of Budget and Finance as part of the University budget request process. Thereafter, any reallocation, modification or reduction of funds based on short-falls from the requested budget shall be determined by the Chancellor through the Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Budget, and Finance with the individual campuses. Such allocations, modifications or retrenchments shall be in conformity with the purposes and criteria set forth in this policy and in consideration of the Fiscal Accountability Plan for the college in question. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.8 Research and Development
Leadership in research and development in basic skills and compensatory education for under prepared and disadvantaged students shall constitute a major responsibility of the Chancellor’s Office and of the leadership of the College Discovery Program, both in the University’s Office of Academic Affairs and on the campuses. To this end, funding should be provided for professional research and evaluation staff and consultants, as needed, to work in the University’s Office of Special Programs and at the individual campus programs, as deemed appropriate in collaboration with the University’s Office of Institutional Research and Assessment to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Assemble and analyze campus-collected and centrally-collected data. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) Conduct special studies. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) Help develop student progress criteria. These criteria shall be sensitive to the complex backgrounds and needs of College Discovery students, but based on “hard” data capable of utilization as progress indicators for College Discovery and other disadvantaged students, applicable to such students individually and in the aggregate. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
9 Student Eligibility
The College Discovery Program is designed to serve the student who is both educationally and economically disadvantaged. A disadvantaged student is defined as an individual from a low income household with potential for a successful higher education experience but who has not acquired all of the basic academic skills required to successfully compete in a higher education environment. Generally, a student who is eligible for the Program has not earned a Regents diploma, is from a high school that has a poor record for academically preparing students, has been tracked or scheduled into a general high school program, has earned a New York State approved General Equivalency Diploma (GED), has been out of high school for a number of years, or ranks low on traditional measures of college admissions criteria, such as high school average and class standing. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Eligibility requirements for admission into the College Discovery Program must comply with the requirements of State law and regulations issued by the State Department of Education. The New York State Board of Regents requires that students be both economically and academically disadvantaged. The Regents define economic disadvantage, and the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York define academic disadvantage. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
9.1 General Requirements
A student eligible for benefits under the College Discovery Program must meet all of the following criteria (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Be both economically and educationally disadvantaged according to criteria in this policy
b) Be a high school graduate or have a New York State approved equivalency diploma or its equivalent
c) Meet at least one of the following conditions (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
(i) Have not previously attended a college or university—except in the case of students enrolled in the State University of New York’s Educational Opportunity Program (EOP), or the independent colleges’ Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP)
(ii) Be a veteran who has earned no more than eighteen credits of college-level work prior to entrance into the service—except for USAFI and service-connected University of Maryland credits
d) Have resided in New York City for at least one year prior to applying to the University
9.2 Academic Eligibility Criteria for First-time Students
A student shall be deemed “educationally disadvantaged” upon application for admission and eligible for the College Discovery Program, if he or she satisfies any of the following four criteria (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) The student has received a New York State approved General Equivalency Diploma. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) The student has earned a College Admissions Average (CAA) of less than eighty percent or a rank in class at the sixty-fifth or lower percentile. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) The student has earned a CAA of eighty percent or above or a rank in class above the sixty-fifth percentile, yet has received either remedial or English language skills assistance in high school and is thus determined to have a continuing need for the range of support services that are available to students in the College Discovery Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
d) The student has earned a CAA of eighty percent or above and is an applicant to a particular program of study, but the student lacks a high school sequence in mathematics or science normally required for such a program and is thus determined to have a need for the services available to students in the College Discovery Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
9.3 Economic Eligibility Criteria for First-time Students
For purposes of determining economic eligibility, a student must meet the economic eligibility criteria established by the New York State Commissioner of Education. The economic eligibility criteria apply to the calendar year prior to the academic year of the student’s first entry into college. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
9.4 Student Financial Aid
Upon admission, all College Discovery students must meet the economic eligibility criteria as established by the Commissioner of Education. A first semester College Discovery student may be permitted to register prior to the verification of his or her economic eligibility if the student has complied with all requests to submit economic verification documents. Under no circumstances shall a student receive College Discovery funds during this provisional period. If, upon receipt and analysis of economic verification documents the student is deemed not to be economically eligible to participate in the Program, the student shall be so notified and removed from the College Discovery Program rolls. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The established economic criteria will apply to students at the time of admission into the College Discovery Program. If the student’s economic status improves in subsequent years, then an appropriate adjustment in the amount of College Discovery financial assistance shall be made to reflect the change in the student’s need. However, his or her entitlement to receive other support services offered by the Program shall not be affected. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In order to receive College Discovery funds and other support services, all first time freshmen in the College Discovery Program must apply for (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) A basic educational opportunity grant (Pel1 Grant) with the appropriate agency of the Federal Government or through the University student aid form for the academic year in which benefits are sought
b) The Tuition Assistant Program (TAP) with the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation or through the University student aid form
Each college, through its college Financial Aid Office, shall be responsible for ensuring that all College Discovery students file for these forms of aid in accordance with the Rules of the Regents and the guidelines established by the University and approved by the State Division of the Budget. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In order to be eligible for College Discovery financial aid and other support services, all College Discovery students must be full-time students. Full-time status shall be defined as a minimum course load of at least twelve credits/equated credits, or its equivalent. However, if due to personal or family responsibilities a student has to register part-time for a particular term, that student must receive approval to do so from the Program Director. Part-time status is granted for one semester and can only be extended by a waiver granted by the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee. This student may apply and receive financial aid for part-time students if he or she meets the economic eligibility criteria for such aid. A student is eligible for the Supplemental Tuition Assistance Program (STAP) if his or her minimum full-time course load—i.e., twelve credits/equated credits—includes fifty percent, or six hours, of non-credit remedial, developmental or compensatory coursework. For the purpose of TAP eligibility, a full-time College Discovery student is a student enrolled for at least twelve credits or a combination of credits and equated credits, three of which must be credit-bearing in the first semester of State supported TAP study, and six credits in the second and subsequent semesters of State supported TAP study. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Each student who registers as a full-time student is expected to maintain a minimum course load of twelve credits or equated credits per semester including remedial, developmental and compensatory courses. However, a student may be granted permission during the semester to drop a course with no change to his or her stipend level, provided that (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Such a drop is recommended by his or her counselor
b) The recommendation is reviewed by the Financial Aid Office and approved by the College Discovery Director
c) Proper authorization is kept on file
d) The number of credits/equated credits does not drop below nine
Full-time students on academic probation will retain the full financial aid and academic support services of the Program. Students who are placed on academic probation with a part-time course load will retain the full academic support services of the Program. This student may apply for and receive financial aid for part-time students if he or she meets the economic eligibility for such aid. A graduating student, whose degree requirements would be met with less than the minimum course load requirements, may be permitted to register for only those courses that are required for graduation. That student will also retain the full academic support services of the Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
10 Period of Student Funding Eligibility
A student is allowed six semesters of opportunity program eligibility, two college summer sessions, the College Discovery Summer Program Component of the University Skills Immersion Program, and intersessions, for the completion of a two-year associate degree program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
When a College Discovery student has utilized STAP during his or her career, that student would be entitled to one or two additional semesters of College Discovery financial aid support (depending on the number of semesters the student received STAP). (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
When a College Discovery student has not been a STAP recipient but will be graduating upon completion of the seventh semester, that student would be eligible for College Discovery financial aid support in that seventh semester. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Requests for funding eligibility exemptions for individuals not otherwise covered by this policy, may be submitted to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
11 Retention Standards
Students in the College Discovery Program shall be subject to the individual college’s retention standards. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The probationary period for College Discovery students shall be a maximum of two consecutive semesters. Students who fail to achieve the required standards after the probationary period shall be dropped from the Program. The regular academic appeals procedure of each college shall consider individual cases and, taking into account the recommendation of the College Discovery Director, grant exceptions as warranted. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The maximum length of time for a leave of absence shall not exceed three consecutive semesters. Where special circumstances warrant, requests for retention standards exceptions along with appropriate justification, shall be transmitted by the College Discovery Director to the University’s Office of Special Programs for appropriate action. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
12 Student Attendance
Attendance by College Discovery students in remedial, developmental and compensatory courses is to be considered compulsory for those students enrolled in such courses. University policy requires compulsory attendance of all students enrolled in remedial, developmental and compensatory courses. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
13 College Discovery Student Rights and Responsibilities
Students in the College Discovery Program are recognized as matriculated, full and equal members of the student body of the college at which they are enrolled and are entitled to all the rights and privileges, as well as subject to all the obligations, of students at the college; and, as College Discovery students, are entitled to special services and also subject to special obligations. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Subject to the provisions of this policy, the additional entitlements and responsibilities of College Discovery students include, but are not limited to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Access to College Discovery counseling and other support services throughout their career as College Discovery students
b) Access to College Discovery funded tutoring on an as-needed basis, in relation to all of the student’s course work at the college
c) Access to financial support, including State special program funding, on an individual as-needed basis
d) Compulsory full-time attendance in all basic skills, developmental and compensatory courses in which enrolled
14 Financial Aid Administration
The principal objective of student financial assistance is to provide the necessary financial support, to the extent possible, to enable the economically disadvantaged student to attend college. The college Financial Aid Office shall be responsible for the processing, awarding and overseeing of all financial aid to College Discovery students. The supervision of all financial aid for College Discovery students shall be vested in the Financial Aid Office in consultation with the College Discovery Director or his or her designee. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Financial Aid Director shall be responsible for verifying students’ economic eligibility for admission into the College Discovery Program. He or she shall also be responsible for the packaging and awarding of financial aid to College Discovery students in accordance with the guidelines and criteria established by the University and the funding authorities. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Appointments of Financial Aid Officers to work either primarily or exclusively on the packaging and documentation of financial aid awards for College Discovery students shall be made by the Financial Aid Director in consultation with the College Discovery Director. Such Financial Aid Officers shall report to and work under the direction of the Director of Financial Aid, but shall maintain liaison with the College Discovery Director or his or her assistant. They shall work in such places as are assigned by the Financial Aid Director; however, in that their primary duty shall be to provide services to College Discovery students, they shall also have an ongoing exchange with the College Discovery Director or his or her assistant. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
15 Annual General Plan and Annual Final Report
As required by the Higher Education Opportunity Act and the regulations of the Board of Regents, the University shall develop and submit to the State authorities an annual General Plan and an annual Final Report covering the organization, development, coordination, and operation of the College Discovery Program. The General Plan and Final Report shall include such information and data as may be required. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The University’s Office of Special Programs in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs shall be responsible for the coordination, compilation, and final preparation of the annual College Discovery General Plan and the annual Final Report for submission to the State authorities, subject to approval by the Chancellor and the Board of Trustees. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
It shall be each President’s responsibility to ensure the timely submission of campus information and data required for the General Plan and Final Report. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.13 Cooperative Programs with the Department of Education :

Policy 1.13 Cooperative Programs with the Department of Education
The Board of Trustees of the City University of New York shall, as a matter of public policy of the highest priority, work cooperatively with the Department of Education of the City of New York to develop and initiate joint programs to help ensure the educational advancement of the students of the public school system. (BTM,1985,04-29,008,_A)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.14 Coursework Completed On Permit :

Policy 1.14 Coursework Completed On Permit
City University of New York students who successfully complete coursework at a CUNY college by means of an authorized permit shall receive full academic degree credit for such work by their home institution and the grade earned for such coursework shall appear on the student’s academic transcript and be included in the calculation of the student’s semester and overall grade point averages. This policy will apply to all earned grades as well as to administrative designations. (BTM,2004,02-23,004,_A)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.15 Departments – Creation, Consolidation, Merger, or Abolition :

Policy 1.15 Departments- Creation, Consolidation, Merger, or Abolition
A recommendation emanating from a college for the creation of a new academic department, the consolidation or merger of existing academic departments, or the abolition of an existing department shall, after review by the Chancellery, be considered by the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research. If the recommendation is approved by the Committee, it shall be considered as a policy calendar item by the Board of Trustees. (BTM,1990,04-23,005,_C)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.16 Exit from Remediation :

Policy 1.16 Exit from Remediation
All colleges shall use common objective tests reflecting national norms, and other assessments as deemed necessary, to determine when students who have been placed in remedial coursework qualify for exit from remediation. The Chancellor, following consultation with appropriate faculty and administrative representatives, shall designate suitable objective tests to be fully implemented by the Spring 2000 semester. (BTM,1999,09-27,005,_A)
The Chancellor shall report to the Board of Trustees periodically on remedial student performance and each college’s compliance with this policy. (BTM,1999,09-27,005,_A)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.17 Experimental Courses :

Policy 1.17 Experimental Courses
The Board of Trustees gives authorization to each senior and community college of The City University of New York to introduce on an experimental basis, as many as fifteen courses per semester approved by the Curriculum Committee of the Faculty Council, and by the President, with the understanding that such courses would not be offered for more than two semesters without the usual Board of Trustees review, and with the further understanding that this resolution does not permit the establishment of new programs, departments, or schools. (BTM,1969,06-23,002,_G)
All courses introduced under this experimental course policy shall be sent for informational purposes only to all members of the Board of Trustees along with the subsequent departmental evaluation of such courses. (BTM,1969,06-23,002,_G)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.171 Failing Grade :

UNIVERSITY POLICY REGARDING COMPUTING “F” IN THE GRADE POINT AVERAGE:
[W]hen an undergraduate student receives the earned academic grade of “F” or an administrative failing grade, and that student subsequently retakes that course and receives a grade of “C” or better, the initial grade of “F” will no longer be computed into the Grade Point Average. The “F” will remain on the transcript. The number of failing credits that can be deleted from the Grade Point Average shall be limited to 16 for the duration of the student’s undergraduate enrollment in institutions of The City University of New York. This policy shall be effective September 1, 1990 at all Colleges of The City University of New York.
(Board of Trustees Minutes,1990,04-23,7,A)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.18 Grant and Contract Based Research :

Policy 1.18 Grant and Contract Based Research
The acceptance of a research grant shall be primarily determined by the promise it holds for advancing or synthesizing basic knowledge of significant phenomena through pure or applied research and by the prospect that the participants in the research will benefit through enhanced professional competence and learning. Possible commercial advantages or financial return to an individual, to the college, or to the agency making the grant, are not primary considerations. (BTM,1957,06-17,118,__)
Where contract research work is to be done on the campus, except in instances where in the judgment of the appropriate dean the use of college facilities is not substantial, the contract shall be negotiated by the contracting agency and the college. The costs for the project are expected to be financed by the contracting agency. Such costs shall include the cost for the use of college facilities and services, including overhead, the stipend—if any—to be paid the staff member for his or her research, and such other items as may enter into the cost of the project. (BTM,1957,06-17,118,__)
The purpose of contract research on any of the campuses shall not be purposefully or primarily directed toward the development of patentable products or processes. In the event that a staff member, in the course of a contract project, comes upon a patentable discovery—which discovery is obviously patentable in the best public interest—then such staff member, with the aid of the Board of Trustees, should apply for a patent. The Board of Trustees and the staff member cooperatively shall determine the extent to which the individual involved should participate in receiving remuneration for the patent or the extent to which research activities at the college should be supported through the application of income therefrom and whether there should be free access to the use of the patent. If the contract between the agency and the college contains provisions for the securing or disposition of a patent, and this contract is approved by the Board of Trustees, the terms of the contract will be binding on all parties concerned. (BTM,1957,06-17,118,__)
The presidents of the colleges, the Provost of the University Graduate School, and the Dean of Teacher Education, or their designees, are authorized on behalf of the Board of Trustees to execute all contracts for research, or to notify grantors of the acceptance of research grants. (BTM,1968,10-28,011,__)
The Research Foundation of the City University of New York has responsibility for administering all grants and contracts awarded to any unit in the University and is mandated to develop procedures that will ensure that its operations are fully responsive to the needs of the college. (BTM,1969,10-27,010,__)
Title to all property purchased by the Research Foundation with funds received under grants, awards or contracts, upon termination of the grant, award or contract, shall be transferred to and vested in the Board of Trustees on behalf of the college or University unit involved in the particular grant, award or contract, in accordance with rules promulgated by the Research Foundation, provided, however, that the Research Foundation shall retain responsibility for such property to the extent necessary to wind up the grant, award or contract, and effect any necessary physical delivery or transfer, and further provided that the terms of the grant, award or contract, and applicable rules and regulations shall control to the extent they may be inconsistent with the provisions of this policy. (BTM,1975,01-27,002,_C)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.19 This Policy Number Not in Use :

This policy number not in use.

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.191 Human Research Protections Program :

Policy 1.191 Human Research Protections Program
CUNY strives to foster a research environment that promotes respect for the rights and welfare of individuals recruited for, or participating in, research conducted by or under the auspices of CUNY. In the review and conduct of human subjects research, actions by CUNY will be guided by the principles (i.e., respect for persons, beneficence, and justice) set forth in the Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research (often referred to as the Belmont Report). The actions of CUNY will also conform to all applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations and this Policy.
All institutional and non-institutional human subjects research performance sites for CUNY, domestic or foreign, are obligated by this Policy to conform to ethical principles which are at least equivalent to those of CUNY or as may be determined by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Secretary.
1 Human Research Protections Program
In order to fulfill its human subjects research mission, CUNY has established a human research protections program (HRPP). The purpose of the HRPP is to:
• Safeguard and promote the welfare of human research subjects by ensuring that their rights, safety and well-being are protected;
• Provide timely and high quality review and monitoring of human subjects research projects; and
• Facilitate excellence in human subjects research.
2 Institutional Official
CUNY has designated an Institutional Official who has overall responsibility for CUNY’s HRPP. The duties of the Institutional Official are as follows:
• Be responsible for compliance with all applicable laws and CUNY policies for the protection of human subjects.
• Be the signatory authority, along with the President of The Research Foundation of The City University of New York, for CUNY’s Federal-wide Assurance to the Office of Human Research Protections.
• Provide support to the HRPP within CUNY’s means.
The Institutional Official has the authority to delegate the performance of such activities as may be necessary in order to fulfill these duties.
3 Institutional Review Boards
To conduct its HRPP responsibilities effectively, CUNY maintains at least one Institutional Review Board (IRB) to review research protocols involving human subjects. Each IRB is an autonomous administrative body established to protect the rights and welfare of human research subjects recruited to participate in research activities conducted by or under the auspices of CUNY. Each IRB has the following authority:
• To approve, require modifications to secure approval, defer, or disapprove all human subjects research activities overseen and conducted by or under the auspices of CUNY, regardless of location of the research activities;
• To suspend or terminate approval of human subjects research not being conducted in accordance with the IRB’s requirements or applicable law or policy, or that has been associated with unexpected serious harm to participants;
• To observe, or have a third party observe, the consent process; and
• To observe, or have a third party observe, the conduct of the human subjects research.
All IRB-approved research studies are subject to ongoing review, which must be conducted at least once annually by an IRB. If approval by the IRB lapses, all research activity must stop. The investigator can petition the IRB to continue an individual participant’s research intervention/interaction during a period of lapsed IRB approval if the investigator believes there is a safety concern or ethical issue such that it is in the best interests of the individual participant to do so.
The IRB has jurisdiction over, and maintains policies regarding, all human subject research conducted by or under the auspices of CUNY, regardless of funding source or performance site. Research by or under the auspices of CUNY includes research:
• conducted at any CUNY facility;
• conducted by or under the direction of any student, faculty member, staff member or agent of CUNY in connection with his or her institutional responsibilities;
• conducted by or under the direction of any student, faculty member, staff member or agent of CUNY using any CUNY property or facility; or
• involving the use of CUNY’s non-public information.
No research involving human subjects may commence until all required CUNY approvals (including IRB) are obtained.
CUNY may review any research protocol and has the right to disapprove the implementation of a research protocol that has been approved by the IRB. However, no one at CUNY shall approve the implementation of any research protocol nor may it override the decision of the IRB concerning a research protocol that has not been approved by the IRB.
4 Operating Procedures
The Institutional Official and the IRB shall adopt operating procedures to implement this Policy. These procedures shall serve as the governing procedures for the conduct and review of all human subjects research conducted by or under the auspices of CUNY.
(BTM,2012,02-27,003,_H)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.192 International Baccauleareate Transfer Credit Award :

THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK – INTERNATIONAL BACCALAURATE TRANSFER CREDIT AWARD:
[T]he Board of Trustees hereby adopts a policy that all undergraduate colleges at the University will award 30 credits to students who have completed an International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma with a score of 30 or higher. Each college may develop specific guidelines articulating IB courses with courses in the major and general education requirements.
Students who have completed an IB diploma with a score of 29 or less and students who did not complete a diploma will be guaranteed credit for higher-level IB exams with scores of “5” or better. The credit awarded will apply toward the overall number of credits required for graduation and in some cases toward major and general education requirements, as determined by each college. This [policy] will become effective June 26, 2017.
(Board of Trustees Minutes,2017,06-26,6,N)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.20 Matriculated Undergraduate Students :

Policy 1.20 Matriculated Undergraduate Students
Any City University of New York undergraduate student who states his or her intent to pursue an approved degree program and is pursuing courses at such time that contribute toward fulfillment by the student of the requirements for completion of said degree program, shall be recognized as a candidate for an approved degree and shall be classified as a matriculated student. An undergraduate University student who is not classified as a matriculated student shall be classified as a non-degree student. (BTM,1977,06-20,006,_C)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.201 Military Service :

THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK ACADEMIC POLICY ON MILITARY SERVICE
1. Definitions
1.1 Veteran-those who were in active military service (which includes basic training) and were released under a condition other than “dishonorable.”
1.2 Military Personnel- persons currently serving in the armed forces of the United States, whether on active duty or reserve or in the National Guard.
2. Admission, Readmission, and Enrollment
2.1Veterans with a high school diploma or GED shall be accepted at one of the colleges of CUNY, subject to space availability.
2.2Veterans with no previous CUNY college experience shall be permitted to file applications for admission at any time prior to the date that registration is scheduled to begin, irrespective of University’s deadlines for filing such applications.
2.3Veterans whose high school averages qualify them for admission may be enrolled as non-matriculated students if they fail to meet admissions application deadlines and space is not available for them as matriculated students. Those veterans shall be enrolled as matriculated students the next semester and shall receive academic credit for courses they completed as non-matriculated students.
2.4When veterans’ applications lack supporting data at the time of scheduled registration, those veterans, subject to space availability, shall be admitted pending receipt of such supporting data, provided, however, that they have presented evidence of a high school diploma or GED.
2.4.1Upon receipt of the supporting documentation to complete their applications, veterans shall be placed in full matriculation if they meet the admission requirements of the college or if they meet the college’s academic standards for continued matriculation at the end of the aforementioned semester.
2.4.2Veterans admitted under section 2.4 shall forfeit their matriculated status if they fail to provide the documentation required by the college to complete the admissions application or if they fail to meet the college’s academic standards for continued matriculation.
2.5Admitted veterans who return from active duty at any time during the term will be given the opportunity to audit courses without credit.
2.6Admitted veterans who return from active duty after the completion of their colleges’ registration period shall be permitted to enroll without late registration fee.
2.7Admitted veterans who are former CUNY students who had been academically dismissed from a college of CUNY shall be granted readmission to that college but placed on probationary status.
2.8Veterans applying to graduate degree programs or applying for graduate non-matriculated status should apply directly to the college that they wish to attend.
3. Academic Credit for Students Called to Active Duty
3.1A student who is called to active duty in the armed forces of the United States or National Guard should be given every consideration around either making up the work for the course, obtaining an Incomplete, or being given the grade that he or she has earned at the time that he or she is called to duty.
3.2At each college, the appropriated committee or other designated authority shall be empowered to grant the remaining number of credits required for graduation to a member of the graduating class who lacks twelve or fewer credits in elective courses to complete the requirements for the degree for those called to active duty in the armed forces of the United States. Credits should be applied from the service members JST (Joint Service Transcript) as MILT elective credit
3.3Colleges shall encourage students who enter military service to maintain their status as students by availing themselves of such opportunities as may be offered to them (by the colleges, by other accredited colleges, and/or by service agencies) to continue their studies while in military service.
4. Academic Credit For Military Training and Experience
4.1CUNY shall adopt the American Council on Education (ACE) guidelines in evaluating transfer credit for military courses and experience. College credit may be awarded up to maximum of forty-five credits (at senior colleges) and thirty credits (at Community Colleges) in specific subject matter area or general electives for the satisfactory completion of Military Service, Experience and Military Training Courses.
4.2The Director of Transfer Courses and Information in CUNY Central shall review military transcripts based on ACE guidelines and issue recommendations for course equivalences to individual colleges.
4.3Individual colleges shall make their own decisions about awarding transfer credits and will submit explanations when they disagree with recommendations issued by CUNY Central.
4.4Credit for Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (“DANTES”), Subject Standardized Tests (“DSST”) and College Level Examination Program (“CLEP”) examinations shall be evaluated by CUNY college academic departments that award CLEP credits. Credit for satisfactory completion of tests and/or examinations shall be awarded where applicable toward the degree the veteran is pursuing.
4.5The following military records shall be used by college academic departments to verify successful completion of military service, experience and military training courses:
• Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (“AARTS”).
• Sailor/Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript (“SMART”).
• Community College for the Air Force (“CCAF”) transcript.
• Coast Guard Institute Military Education Transcript.
• DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Learning Experiences During Military Service. Military Education offices can provide this form to active-duty and reservists. This form must be certified by an authorized commissioned officer or his/her designee.
• DD Form 214, Certificate of Release or Discharge for Active Duty.
4.6The Office of the University Registrar should maintain a central repository of college decisions on credit awards, and make that repository available to student applicants.
4.7Credits for military training accepted at one CUNY college shall be accepted by other CUNY colleges without exception for veterans who transfer within CUNY.
5. Application Fee Waiver for Veterans
5.1Veterans shall be eligible for an application fee waiver for both undergraduate and graduate programs at CUNY. The instructions for undergraduates requesting this waiver shall be posted on the CUNY website. In order to receive their application fee waiver, veterans applying to graduate programs should contact the Graduate Admissions Office of the college(s) to which they are applying.
5.2Veterans shall also be exempt from paying a commitment deposit for both undergraduate and graduate programs at CUNY. Upon acceptance of veterans for admission, colleges shall provide veterans with information concerning this exemption.
6. Fees for Military Personnel Stationed in New York State and their families
6.1For the purpose of calculating tuition and fee charges, military personnel stationed in New York State, their spouses, partners in a civil union, or registered domestic partners, and their dependent children, shall be considered residents of New York State.
(Board of Trustees Minutes,1945,06-18,4; Board of Trustees Minutes,1952,04-21,13; Board of Trustees Minutes,1975,01-27,2,B. Amended: Board of Trustees Minutes,2014,06-30,5,G)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.21 This Policy Number Not in Use :

This policy number not in use.

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.22 This Policy Number Not in Use :

This policy number not in use.

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.23 Reorganization of Graduate Division :

Policy 1.23 Reorganization of Graduate Division as Graduate School and University Center
The Graduate School and University Center shall be structured as follows: The Graduate School and University Center shall be headed by a president. (BTM,1971,12-20,004,__)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.24 Research Misconduct :

POLICY REGARDING THE DISPOSITION OF ALLEGATIONS OF RESEARCH MISCONDUCT
1. GENERAL STATEMENT OF POLICY
A fundamental purpose of the University is to foster an environment that promotes the responsible conduct of research and similar educational activities (collectively, “research”), discourages Research Misconduct, and deals promptly with any Allegations or Evidence of possible Research Misconduct. (Definitions of “Research Misconduct”, “Allegation”, “Evidence” and other terms in this Policy that appear with initial capital letters are set forth in Section 12 below.) It is the University’s basic expectation that all research conducted by members of the University community will adhere to the highest ethical and moral standards. This Policy describes the procedures to be followed by the University in connection with any Allegation that University faculty, staff, post-doctoral associates, and/or students, whether paid by the University or through other funding sources, may have engaged in Research Misconduct. This Policy is also intended to comply with the requirements of applicable regulatory agencies and the sponsors of research.
2. APPLICABILITY
This Policy applies only to Allegations of Fabrication, Falsification, and Plagiarism in research, as such terms are defined in Section 12 below, and not to any other kind of academic misconduct or dishonesty. This Policy applies to all research conducted by University faculty, staff, post-doctoral associates, and/or students, regardless of the academic discipline of the researcher or the sponsorship or source of support for the research. This Policy does not supersede or establish an alternative to any existing University or governmental regulations, procedures, or policies regarding fiscal improprieties, conflicts of interest, ethical treatment of human or animal subjects, or criminal matters, all of which remain in effect.
It is the University’s expectation that all members of the University community will cooperate in reporting suspected Research Misconduct, responding to Allegations, providing relevant Research Records and other relevant information, and participating in Research Misconduct Proceedings.
This Policy replaces the University’s Policy Regarding the Disposition of Allegations of Misconduct in Research and Similar Educational Activities, adopted on June 25, 2007.
3. REPORTING ALLEGATIONS OF RESEARCH MISCONDUCT
Allegations of Research Misconduct may be brought to the University’s attention as follows:
3.1.Any individual may report suspected Research Misconduct by one or more persons orally or in writing. Such individual (the “Complainant”) should address such Allegation to the Research Integrity Officer (“RIO”) of the College where the subject of the Allegation (the “Respondent”) has an appointment. In cases where the Respondent is a faculty member with joint appointments, the Allegation should be reported to the RIO of the “home College”, as determined in accordance with the University’s Joint Appointment Guidelines. If the Allegation is reported to the RIO orally, the RIO will contemporaneously create a written record of the Allegation.
3.2.If an Allegation is received by another University administrator or identified in the course of another University process, such as an internal audit, the responsible administrator must immediately notify the RIO of the Allegation in writing. The RIO may initiate a Research Misconduct Proceeding regardless of the conduct or outcome of the other University processes.
3.3.A regulatory agency or research sponsor may forward an Allegation of Research Misconduct at the University to the Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee, and the Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee will then determine whether to accept the responsibility of an Inquiry or an Investigation of the Allegation on behalf of the University. If the regulatory agency or research sponsor has conducted an Inquiry, the University’s Research Misconduct Proceeding may begin at the Investigation stage. The Vice Chancellor for Research will give notice of the Allegation to the President and the RIO at the appropriate College and, if the Allegation involves sponsored research, the President of the Research Foundation. The University Director for Research Compliance, in collaboration with the RIO, will notify the Respondent of the Allegation.
4. INDIVIDUAL OBLIGATIONS REGARDING INVESTIGATIONS CONDUCTED BY A REGULATORY AGENCY OR RESEARCH SPONSOR
If a University faculty or staff member, post-doctoral associate, or student becomes the subject of an Investigation of any kind conducted by a regulatory agency or research sponsor concerning an Allegation of Research Misconduct, such individual must report the existence of the Investigation immediately in writing to the Chief Academic Officer of his or her College. Upon receiving such notification, the Chief Academic Officer will give notice of the pending Investigation to the Vice Chancellor for Research and, if the pending Investigation involves sponsored research, the President of the Research Foundation. Failure to disclose a pending Investigation pursuant to this section may subject the University faculty or staff member, post-doctoral associate, or student to disciplinary or other appropriate action.
5. CONFIDENTIALITY
In order to protect the privacy and professional reputations of those involved, all Research Misconduct Proceedings will be conducted in a fashion designed to maintain confidentiality. Knowledge of the Research Misconduct Proceedings and the disclosure of the identity of the Respondents and the Complainants will be limited, to the extent possible, to those who need to know, consistent with a thorough, competent, objective, and fair Research Misconduct Proceeding, and as allowed by law. Except as may otherwise be prescribed by applicable law, confidentiality of any Research Records or Evidence from which research subjects might be identified must be maintained. Disclosure of such Research Records or Evidence will be limited to those who have a need to know to carry out a Research Misconduct Proceeding. All individuals having knowledge of the identity of the Respondents and the Complainants and access to information in any reports or drafts thereof prepared in connection with a Research Misconduct Proceeding must keep such knowledge and information confidential.
6. INQUIRY
6.1.Upon receipt of an Allegation of Research Misconduct, the RIO will promptly determine whether or not an Inquiry is warranted. An Inquiry is warranted if the Allegation (a) falls within the definition of Research Misconduct in Section 12.17 below; (b) is made against a person to whom this Policy applies; and (c) is sufficiently credible and specific so that potential Evidence of Research Misconduct may be identified. The purpose of an Inquiry is preliminary information-gathering and preliminary fact-finding to determine whether the Allegation warrants a formal Investigation, as described in Section 7 below. An Inquiry is not a formal hearing requiring a full review of all Research Records and Evidence related to the Allegation.
6.2.Promptly following the RIO’s determination of whether or not an Inquiry is warranted, the RIO will consult the Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee regarding the determination and, if an Inquiry is warranted, regarding the appropriate scope of the Inquiry and the requirements and procedures for securing related Research Records and Evidence. Either before or at the time the RIO notifies the Respondent of the Allegation as provided in Section 6.3 below, the RIO will secure the related Research Records and Evidence in accordance with Section 8.1 below. If the RIO determines that an Inquiry is NOT warranted, he or she will give notice of such determination and a summary of the Allegation to the President in writing.
6.3.Once the RIO determines that an Inquiry is warranted, the RIO will notify the Respondent, the Complainant, and the President in writing of the Allegation that has been filed and that an Inquiry will be conducted. If the Inquiry subsequently identifies additional Respondents, the RIO will also notify them in writing.
6.4.Promptly following the RIO’s determination that an Inquiry is warranted, the securing of the related Research Records and Evidence, and the notifications required under Section 6.3 above, the RIO will conduct an Inquiry to determine whether an Investigation of the Allegation is warranted. An Investigation is warranted if there is (a) a reasonable basis for concluding that the Allegation falls within the definition of Research Misconduct under Section 12.17 below, and (b) preliminary information-gathering and preliminary fact-finding from the Inquiry indicates that the Allegation may have substance.
6.5.Promptly following the completion of the Inquiry, the RIO will prepare a preliminary Inquiry report that will include the following information: (a) the name and position of the Respondent; (b) a description of each Allegation of Research Misconduct; (c) whether the Allegation is associated with sponsored research, and the related contract or grant number, if any; (d) a summary of the steps taken during the Inquiry; (e) a summary of the results of the Inquiry; (f) the basis for concluding that the Allegation falls within the definition of Research Misconduct; (g) a recommendation to the President as to whether or not an Investigation is warranted; and (h) attachments of any relevant materials used in the Inquiry.
6.6.The RIO will provide the Respondent an opportunity to review and comment on the preliminary Inquiry report. Upon receipt of the comments from the Respondent, the RIO will attach the Respondent’s comments to the preliminary Inquiry report and submit this final Inquiry report to the President. Upon receipt of the final Inquiry report, the President, in consultation with the University Vice Provost for Research and the RIO, will make the decision as to whether to refer the case for an Investigation.
6.7.All efforts should be made to complete the Inquiry as expeditiously as possible, and within 60 calendar days of its initiation, unless circumstances clearly warrant a longer period. If the Inquiry takes longer than 60 calendar days to complete, the Inquiry record must include documentation of the reasons for exceeding the 60-day period.
6.8.If the President decides that an Investigation is NOT warranted, he or she must consult with the Vice Chancellor for Research prior to closing the case. If the Vice Chancellor for Research is in agreement with the President, the matter will be closed and all records of the proceedings treated as confidential pursuant to Section 5 to respect the rights and protect the reputations of all parties involved. All reasonable and practical efforts, if requested and as appropriate, will be undertaken to protect or restore the reputation of the Respondent. The RIO will notify the Respondent and the Complainant of this decision in writing.
6.9.If the President decides that an Investigation is warranted, the RIO will so notify the Respondent and the Complainant in writing within a reasonable time after the President’s decision, but before the Investigation begins. The notice to the Respondent must include a copy of the final Inquiry report and include a copy of, or refer to, this Policy and the relevant regulations or policies of the applicable regulatory agency and/or research sponsor, if any.
6.10.If the President decides that an Investigation is warranted, he or she will send the final Inquiry report to the Vice Chancellor for Research for Investigation of the case within 14 calendar days of this decision. If the research involved in the Allegation is supported by a grant or contract from a research sponsor, the Vice Chancellor for Research will notify the President of the Research Foundation and the sponsor in accordance with sponsor requirements.
7. INVESTIGATION
7.1.Upon receipt of the final Inquiry Report, the Vice Chancellor for Research will appoint at least three members of University or College staff or tenured faculty at any College to an Investigation Committee to conduct the Investigation. A majority of the members of the Investigation Committee will be tenured faculty actively involved in research in the same field as the Respondent or a related field, and a majority of the members of the Investigation Committee will be tenured faculty members at Colleges other than the Respondent’s College. In addition, no staff member of the Respondent’s College may serve on the Investigation Committee.
7.2.The Investigation will begin within 30 calendar days after the President’s referral of the case to the Vice Chancellor for Research. The Investigation Committee will give the Respondent written notice of any new Allegations of Research Misconduct not addressed during the Inquiry or in the initial notice of the Investigation within a reasonable amount of time after a determination to pursue any such new Allegations.
7.3.The University will take reasonable steps to ensure an impartial and unbiased Investigation to the maximum extent practicable, including participation of persons with appropriate expertise who do not have unresolved personal, professional, or financial conflicts of interest with, or biases against, those involved with the Inquiry or the Investigation.
7.4.The Investigation Committee will use diligent efforts to ensure that the Investigation is thorough and sufficiently documented and that it includes an examination of all Research Records and Evidence relevant to reaching a decision on the merits of the Allegations. If the Respondent refuses to make any such Research Records and Evidence available for the Investigation, the Investigation Committee may draw adverse inferences from such refusal.
7.5.The Investigation Committee will comply with the requirements of any applicable regulatory agency and/or research sponsor regarding the interviewing of individuals in connection with the Investigation, will use reasonable efforts to interview each Respondent, the Complainant, and any other available person whom the Investigation Committee has identified as having information regarding any relevant aspects of the Investigation, and will keep written records of each interview.
7.6.Upon completion of the Investigation, the Investigation Committee will prepare a draft Investigation report and will provide the Respondent a copy of the draft Investigation report and, concurrently, provide the Respondent and/or his or her union representative or legal counsel, if any, a copy of, or supervised access to, the Evidence on which the draft Investigation report is based. The comments of the Respondent on the draft Investigation report, if any, must be submitted within 30 calendar days of the date on which the Respondent received the draft report.
7.7.The Investigation Committee will promptly review any comments on the draft Investigation report by the Respondent and decide whether or not to make a finding of Research Misconduct. The Investigation Committee will document its decision in the final Investigation report. The final Investigation report will be in writing and will:
a) Describe the nature of the Allegations of Research Misconduct;
b) Identify the research sponsor support, if any, and include any grant or contract numbers, grant or contract applications, grants or contracts, and publications listing the support;
c) Describe the specific Allegations of Research Misconduct for consideration in the Investigation;
d) Include the University policies and procedures under which the Investigation was conducted;
e) Identify and summarize the Research Records and Evidence reviewed, and identify any Evidence taken into custody but not reviewed;
f) For each separate Allegation of Research Misconduct identified during the Investigation, provide a finding as to whether Research Misconduct did or did not occur, and if so:
i) Identify whether the Research Misconduct was Falsification, Fabrication, or Plagiarism, and if it was intentional, knowing, or in reckless disregard;
ii) Summarize the facts and the analysis that support the conclusion and consider the merits of any reasonable explanation by the Respondent;
iii) Identify the specific research sponsor support, if any;
iv) Identify whether any publications need correction or retraction;
v) Identify the person(s) responsible for the Research Misconduct; and
vi) List any current support or known applications or proposals for support that the Respondent has pending with any research sponsors; and
g) Include and consider any comments made by the Respondent on the draft Investigation report.
7.8.The Investigation Committee will submit the final Investigation report to the Vice Chancellor for Research, who will then discuss the report with the President. The President will notify the RIO, the Respondent, and the Complainant of the Investigation Committee’s finding as to whether Research Misconduct did or did not occur and, in the case of a finding of Research Misconduct, will decide whether any subsequent disciplinary actions by the University are warranted. If the President finds that subsequent disciplinary actions are warranted as a result of the Investigation, the University may conduct a disciplinary proceeding in connection with the finding in accordance with applicable collective bargaining agreements, the University Bylaws, and/or other applicable policies of the University.
7.9.If the research involved in the Allegations is or was supported by a grant or a contract, the Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee, in collaboration with the Grants Officer at the College, will report and respond to any applicable regulatory agency and/or research sponsor as outlined in Section 9 below and send a copy of any such communication to the President of the Research Foundation.
7.10.All aspects of the Investigation, including conducting the Investigation, preparing the draft Investigation report and providing it for comment, deciding whether or not to make a finding of Research Misconduct, preparing the final Investigation report, and notifying any applicable regulatory agency and/or research sponsor in accordance with its requirements, will be completed within 120 calendar days of the beginning of the Investigation.
7.11.If, upon the conclusion of an Investigation, it is determined that the Respondent has NOT committed any Research Misconduct, the matter will be closed, the Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee will notify in writing any applicable regulatory agency and/or research sponsor and, if the Allegation involves sponsored research, the President of the Research Foundation, and all records of the proceedings will be treated as confidential pursuant to Section 5 above to respect the rights and protect the reputations of all parties involved. All reasonable and practical efforts, if requested and as appropriate, will be undertaken to protect or restore the reputation of persons alleged to have engaged in Research Misconduct but against whom no finding of Research Misconduct is made.
8. SECURING OF RESEARCH RECORDS AND EVIDENCE
8.1.Pursuant to section 6.2 above, the RIO will comply with the requirements and procedures for securing Research Records and Evidence based on consultation with the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research. Either before or at the time the RIO notifies the Respondent of the Allegation and at any other time during the course of an Inquiry when additional Research Records or Evidence are discovered, the RIO, with any necessary assistance from the Legal Affairs Designee at the College and in consultation with the University Director for Research Compliance, will take all reasonable and practical steps to (a) obtain custody of all the Research Records and Evidence needed to conduct the Research Misconduct Proceeding, (b) inventory the Research Records and Evidence, and (c) sequester the Research Records and Evidence in a secure manner; except that where the Research Records or Evidence encompass scientific instruments shared by a number of users, custody may be limited to copies of the Research Records or Evidence on such instruments, so long as those copies are substantially equivalent to the evidentiary value of the instruments. To the extent that compliance with the requirements and procedures for securing Research Records and Evidence involves monitoring or inspecting the activity and accounts of individual users of the University’s computer resources, the RIO, the Legal Affairs Designee at the College, and the University Director for Research Compliance will comply with the requirements of Section 13(c) of the University’s Policy on Acceptable Use of Computer Resources.
8.2.The RIO will maintain the Research Records and Evidence as required under Section 11 below.
8.3.If, in accordance with Section 6.4 above, it is determined that an Investigation is warranted, the University Director for Research Compliance, with assistance from the RIO and the Legal Affairs Designee at the College, will perform at the Investigation stage the responsibilities of the RIO regarding the securing and maintenance of Research Records and Evidence as set forth in Sections 8.1 and 8.2 above.
8.4.Where appropriate, the Respondent will be given copies of, or reasonable supervised access to, the Research Records or Evidence to allow the Respondent to continue to do his or her work during an Inquiry, Investigation, and/or any related disciplinary proceedings.
9. REPORTING AND RESPONDING TO REGULATORY AGENCIES AND RESEARCH SPONSORS
9.1.The Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee, in collaboration with the Grants Officer at the College, will report and respond to all applicable regulatory agencies and research sponsors with regard to Allegations of Research Misconduct in accordance with applicable regulations and sponsor policies. Depending on the regulatory agency or the research sponsor, reporting requirements may begin immediately upon receipt of an Allegation and continue during and after the Research Misconduct Proceedings. If the Allegation involves sponsored research, the Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee will send to the President of the Research Foundation a copy of all such reports and responses to the research sponsor, as well as a copy of any follow-up communications with the research sponsor.
9.2.The Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee will immediately notify the applicable regulatory agency and/or research sponsor providing support for research that is the subject of an Allegation of Research Misconduct, as well as the President of the Research Foundation, if, at any time during any related Research Misconduct Proceeding, the University has reason to believe that any of the following conditions exist:
a) Health or safety of the public is at risk, including an immediate need to protect human or animal subjects;
b) Research sponsor resources or interests are threatened;
c) Research activities should be suspended;
d) There is reasonable indication of possible violations of civil or criminal law;
e) Governmental or other action is required to protect the interests of those involved in the Research Misconduct Proceeding;
f) The University believes the Research Misconduct Proceeding may be made public prematurely, so that the regulatory agency and/or research sponsor may take appropriate steps to safeguard Evidence and protect the rights of those involved; and
g) The research community or the public should be informed.
10. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS
10.1.When being interviewed by the RIO or appearing before the Investigation Committee, the Respondent may be accompanied by a union representative or legal counsel. However, neither the Inquiry nor the Investigation is a trial-type proceeding, and the union representative or legal counsel may not actively participate in the proceeding, such as by directing questions or answers or offering argument on behalf of the Respondent.
10.2.The Respondent may be suspended or removed from work under a research grant or contract by the President, in consultation with the Vice Chancellor for Research, any time following the commencement of an Inquiry regarding an Allegation of Research Misconduct about such research if, in the judgment of the President, such suspension or removal is warranted by the circumstances. Depending on developments in the Inquiry or Investigation, the President may, in consultation with the Vice Chancellor for Research, restore the Respondent to the work under the research grant or contract. The Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee will notify any applicable regulatory agency and/or research sponsor of any suspension, removal, or restoration decision under this section, and will send the President of the Research Foundation a copy of any such notice and any follow-up communications with the regulatory agency or research sponsor.
10.3.If the Respondent admits the accuracy of an Allegation of Research Misconduct in the course of an Inquiry or Investigation, the matter will be directly forwarded to the President for appropriate action, which may include disciplinary action under applicable collective bargaining agreements, the University Bylaws, or other applicable policies of the University.
10.4.Allegations that are brought in good faith may not be the basis of any Retaliation against the Complainant, even if the Allegations are not substantiated upon Inquiry or Investigation. All reasonable and practical efforts will be undertaken, as appropriate, to protect or restore the position and reputation of any Complainant and any witness or other individual involved in a Research Misconduct Proceeding, and to counter potential or actual Retaliation against such individuals.
10.5.The RIOs, members of the Investigation Committee, the President and all others responsible for carrying out any part of a Research Misconduct Proceeding, the Vice Chancellor for Research, and the University Director for Research Compliance:
a) will take precautions to ensure that they do not have real or apparent personal, professional, or financial conflicts of interest with, or biases against, any Respondent, any Complainant, or any witness in a Research Misconduct Proceeding;
b) will at all times conduct their activities related to the implementation of this Policy in a fashion that is consistent with their obligations under applicable federal, state, and local laws, rules, and regulations; and
c) may request the assistance of legal counsel from the University’s Office of the General Counsel during the course of their activities related to the implementation of this Policy.
11. RECORD KEEPING
The University has a continuing obligation under this Policy to ensure that it maintains adequate records of a Research Misconduct Proceeding. The RIO will maintain in a secure manner sufficiently detailed documentation of each Inquiry, including related Research Records and Evidence, and the University Director for Research Compliance will maintain in a secure manner sufficiently detailed documentation of each Investigation, including related Research Records and Evidence, for seven years after (a) the completion of the Research Misconduct Proceeding or (b) the completion of any regulatory agency or research sponsor proceeding involving the Allegations of Research Misconduct, whichever is later, in order to permit a later assessment by the regulatory agency or research sponsor or otherwise. To the extent that the RIO forwards such original detailed documentation of an Inquiry to the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research in connection with an Investigation, the University Director for Research Compliance will be responsible for maintaining such documentation for the period provided in this section.
12. DEFINITIONS
12.1. Allegation means a disclosure of possible Research Misconduct through any means of communication. The disclosure may be by written or oral statement or other communication.
12.2. College means an educational unit of the University, including all senior colleges and community colleges, the Graduate School and University Center (including, without limitation, the School of Professional Studies, the Graduate School of Journalism, and the CUNY School of Public Health), the City University School of Law, and the University’s Central Office (which, for purposes of this Policy, includes the University’s Advanced Science Research Center).
12.3. Complainant means a person who makes an Allegation of Research Misconduct.
12.4. Evidence means any document, tangible item, or testimony offered or obtained during a Research Misconduct Proceeding that tends to prove or disprove the existence of an alleged fact.
12.5. Fabrication means making up data or results and recording or reporting them.
12.6. Falsification means manipulating research materials, equipment, or processes, or changing or omitting data or results such that the research is not accurately represented in the research record.
12.7. Inquiry means preliminary information-gathering and preliminary fact-finding to determine whether an Allegation has substance and if an Investigation is warranted. An Investigation must be undertaken if the Inquiry determines the Allegation has substance.
12.8. Investigation means the formal development, examination, and evaluation of a factual record to determine whether Research Misconduct has taken place, to assess its extent and consequences, and to evaluate appropriate action.
12.9. Investigation Committee means the committee consisting of at least three members of University staff or tenured faculty at any College actively involved in research in the same field as the Respondent or a related field who are appointed by the Vice Chancellor for Research to investigate charges of Research Misconduct against faculty, staff, post-doctoral associates, and/or students.
12.10. Legal Affairs Designee means the individual at each College designated by the President to deal with legal issues at the College in conjunction with the University’s Office of the General Counsel.
12.11. Plagiarism means the appropriation of another person’s ideas, processes, results, or words without giving appropriate credit.
12.12. Policy means this Policy regarding the Disposition of Allegations of Research Misconduct.
12.13. Preponderance of the Evidence means proof by information that, compared with that opposing it, leads to the conclusion that the fact at issue is more probably true than not.
12.14. President, except for the President of the Research Foundation, means the President or Dean of each College, as applicable. For purposes of this Policy, the Chancellor or his or her designee will be deemed to be the President of the University’s Central Office.
12.15. Research Foundation means the Research Foundation of The City University of New York.
12.16. Research Integrity Officer (“RIO”) means the official at each College designated by the President of the College after consulting with the appropriate faculty governance body at the College to be responsible for receiving Allegations of Research Misconduct, determining whether such Allegations warrant Inquiries, conducting the Inquiries and preparing the Inquiry reports, recommending to the President whether or not Investigations are warranted, and assisting in the Investigations by the Investigation Committee. The RIO must be an administrator or tenured faculty member at the College with experience in research and will be provided appropriate training to carry out his or her responsibilities under this Policy.
12.17. Research Misconduct means Fabrication, Falsification, or Plagiarism in proposing or performing research, reviewing research, or in reporting research results. Research Misconduct does not include honest error or differences of opinion. A finding of Research Misconduct made under this Policy requires that: (a) there be a significant departure from accepted practices of the relevant research community; (b) the misconduct be committed intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly; and (c) the Allegation be proven by a Preponderance of the Evidence.
12.18. Research Misconduct Proceeding means any action related to alleged Research Misconduct taken under this Policy, including but not limited to, determinations of whether or not an Inquiry is warranted, Inquiries, Investigations, and regulatory agency or research sponsor oversight reviews, hearings, and administrative appeals.
12.19. Research Record means the record of data or results that embody the facts resulting from a research inquiry, including, but not limited to, research proposals, laboratory records, both physical and electronic, progress reports, abstracts, theses, oral presentations, internal reports, journal

ARTICLEs, and any documents and materials provided in the course of a Research Misconduct Proceeding.
12.20. Respondent means the person against whom an Allegation of Research Misconduct is directed or who is the subject of a Research Misconduct Proceeding.
12.21. Retaliation means an adverse action taken against a Complainant, witness, or other participant in a Research Misconduct Proceeding in response to (a) a good faith Allegation of Research Misconduct, or (b) good faith cooperation with a Research Misconduct Proceeding.
12.22. University means The City University of New York.
12.23. Vice Chancellor for Research means the University’s Vice Chancellor for Research. If there is a vacancy at any time in the position of Vice Chancellor for Research, the University’s Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee will assume the responsibilities assigned to the Vice Chancellor for Research under this Policy. Similarly, if there is a vacancy at any time in the position of University Director for Research Compliance, the Vice Chancellor for Research or his or her designee will assume the responsibilities assigned to the University Director for Research Compliance under this Policy.
(Board of Trustees Minutes,2007,06-25,4,K. Amended: Board of Trustees Minutes,2015,03-02,4,J; Board of Trustees Minutes,2017,06-26,6,P)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.25 Research and Scholarship :

Policy 1.25 Research and Scholarship
The role of a university includes both the transmission of knowledge and the expansion of its frontiers, and the extent to which both of these roles are fulfilled, affects the reputation of the university and its ability to attract able faculty and students. (BTM,1979,12-17,004,_E)
For these roles to be fulfilled at their most advanced level, faculty and students engage in research or scholarship. (BTM,1979,12-17,004,_E)
A student associated with faculty and other students engaged in research or scholarship gains insight into the depths of a field of knowledge that is not available by other means, thus improving the education the student receives and generating an intellectual vitality among students and faculty. (BTM,1979,12-17,004,_E)
The Board of Trustees wishes at this time to reaffirm its commitment to the role of research and scholarship in the intellectual life of The City University of New York. (BTM,1979,12-17,004,_E)
Whenever a faculty member performs research in a setting other than the University, the University students, whenever possible, are to be involved. (BTM,1979,12-17,004,_E)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.26 Retention and Progress :

UNIVERSITY STUDENT RETENTION AND PROGRESS POLICY
Satisfactory progress toward a degree shall be defined as the satisfactory completion of:
a) At least one-half of the first four courses or twelve credits attempted
b) At least two-thirds of the second four courses or twelve credits attempted
c) At least three-quarters of the third four courses or twelve credits attempted
d) At least three-quarters of all courses attempted in any subsequent semester
Each student will be expected to maintain a grade point average of at least 1.50 for the first four courses, or twelve credits, attempted and at least a 1.75 grade point average for the first eight courses, or twenty-four credits, attempted. In each subsequent semester students will be expected to maintain at least a 2.00 grade point average.
The Chancellor is authorized to promulgate the minimal standards for satisfactory progress for full-time undergraduate students to be used for determining student eligibility for State financial assistance and not for general institutional use. Through the normal academic processes each college is to recommend to the Board of Trustees, with the approval of the Chancellor, its minimal academic standards for retention of full-time and part-time students. These standards are to be designed for general institutional use.
Students who fail to meet their college’s retention standards or the conditions of an academic or other probation, are to be dropped from their college but may apply for readmission no sooner than one semester after their dismissal and will be subject to normal college admission decisions. The normal college processes dealing with student placement on academic probation, attendance probation, or other probation deemed advisable by the faculty are to be continued with the condition that approval of the appeal, for purposes of federal financial assistance requires:
• An evaluation of the feasibility of the student obtaining the requisite GPA for retention by the next semester or term, or;
• The establishment of an academic plan, to be monitored for multiple terms, if necessary to obtain the GPA required by the retention standard.
Students moving to the upper divisions of a four-year college either from the lower divisions of the college or from a community college within The City University of New York system or outside of it must provide evidence, in accordance with a standard to be determined by the Chancellor, that they have attained a level of proficiency in basic learning skills necessary to cope successfully with advanced work in the academic disciplines.
(Board of Trustees Minutes,1976,04-05,7,A. Amended: Board of Trustees Minutes,1981,03-23,5,C; Board of Trustees Minutes,2013,11-25,5,I)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.27 SEEK :

Policy 1.27 SEEK
1 Purposes and Objectives
The overall mission of the SEEK Program (Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge), which is basic to the central mission of The City University of New York, is to assist in providing equality of higher educational opportunity to students who otherwise would not have such access, so as to increase the level of education, social health, and vocational capability in our City and State. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In fulfilling this general mission, the SEEK Program has the following specific purposes and objectives (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) To provide on each senior college campus a permanent and structured program of special assistance to selected students who require and can utilize such assistance to overcome educational, economic and social disadvantage to achieve a quality college education and expand their social and career capabilities. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) To provide, with special funding, a range of intensive support services, as provided for under the Higher Education Opportunity Act and as specified in this policy, to aid each SEEK student to bridge as successfully and expeditiously as possible the gap between special remedial, developmental and compensatory courses and programs and the regular college curriculum. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) To explore, develop, and demonstrate innovative educational techniques and processes for providing intensive remediation in basic skills and other supportive educational services aimed at enabling fundamentally capable students to overcome the severe handicaps of educational under-preparation and other relevant disadvantages with the goal of achieving regular college status and obtaining a baccalaureate education. Applicable experimentation and demonstration, and implementation of findings, shall be facilitated by the leadership of the SEEK Program and by the University’s top educational leadership. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
d) To provide the appropriate supports of the SEEK Program to those College Discovery students who move forward into the senior colleges following the completion of associate degree programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
e) To encourage the faculty and administration of each senior college to accept the purposes set forth in this policy as being among the central missions of the college. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2 Definitions
2.1 SEEK Program
The SEEK Program is to be considered, and is hereby defined as, one of the major programs of the University and of each of its senior colleges. The SEEK Program is hereby defined as the totality of the University’s activities and involvement with those students admitted as SEEK students, including the processes of recruitment, selection, admission, orientation, remediation, advisement, counseling, financial aid, developmental and compensatory instruction, and regular instruction from admission to graduation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
With final responsibility vested in the Chancellor and the presidents, subject to the terms and provisions of this policy, the college administrations, faculties, and staff, the campus SEEK departments, and the University’s Office of Special Programs in the University’s Office of Academic Affairs, shall each, as appropriate, be considered responsible and accountable for the operation and administration of the Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The special aspects and components of the SEEK Program shall consist of the following (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Counseling and advisement services in the course of screening potential students. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) Special diagnostic testing, tutoring, counseling and advisement services for enrolled students. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) Intensive remediation in basic skills, developmental and compensatory courses and summer classes for such students. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
d) Necessary supplementary financial assistance, including the cost of books and necessary maintenance in accordance with criteria and guidelines promulgated by the University and approved by appropriate external authorities. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
e) Administration, accounting, research, monitoring and evaluation services provided by the University’s Office of Special Programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.2 SEEK Department
The SEEK Department is the academic and administrative unit on each senior college campus responsible for the operation and conduct of particular components of the SEEK Program, as specified in this policy, and for monitoring the entire Program, as provided herein, in a manner to be specifically described in the Academic and Fiscal Accountability Plans of each college. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.3 SEEK Budget
The SEEK Budget is that portion of the University budget that consists of special funds provided under the terms of the State’s Higher Education Opportunity Program Act and other externally provided funds, earmarked for the special functions and purposes described in the Act and in other relevant local 1egislation. These consist of funds for counseling, tutoring, and student stipends. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.4 Matriculation
All SEEK students must be matriculated from the time of their first enrollment. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Full-time matriculated students must satisfy the requirements of the Regents Regulations, which state, “Full-time study…means enrollment for at least twelve semester hours a semester or the equivalent.”
Under extenuating circumstances, SEEK students may obtain part-time status. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Part-time status is granted for only one semester and extended only through a waiver granted by the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Students attending part-time must enroll for at least six semester hours or the equivalent per term, except for graduating seniors. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.5 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
A Full-Time Equivalent is the standard academic measuring unit used to calculate enrollment. For this policy the following statements apply (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) For full-time students enrolled in a full-time program during the academic year, the FTE is equivalent to the headcount. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) Students enrolled full-time must carry a minimum of twelve semester credits or the equivalent. However, if due to personal or family responsibilities a student has to register part-time for a particular term, the FTE for this student, registered in a full-time program, will be calculated on an annual thirty credits basis. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) Students enrolled part-time must carry a minimum of six semester hours or the equivalent per term. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.6 Developmental Education
The Developmental Education component of the SEEK Program shall be defined as those instructional activities designed to facilitate the development of basic skills and basic academic knowledge and disciplines required to build a bridge between pre-college capability and successful performance in college level academic course work. Remediation is to be defined as the phase focused on the acquisition of the basic skills in reading, writing, mathematics and speech. In developmental courses, primary emphasis shall be given to the development of comprehensive basic verbal, reading, writing and mathematical skills. Developmental Education may include, but need not be limited to, structured courses, workshops, seminars, and study labs, among other pedagogic approaches. Academic credit shall be given only to the extent that college level material is integrated into the courses, seminars, workshops, etc. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The total number of credits toward graduation to be awarded to any student for any number or combination of the above-defined courses shall not exceed twelve credits. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.7 Compensatory Courses
Compensatory courses are all non-remedial credit-bearing courses that have compensatory excess hours attached. Compensatory excess hours are all contact hours of a remedial nature in excess of course credit weight attached to a non-remedial course. For FTE computation, credits assigned to courses are counted as credits, and excess hours in compensatory courses are counted as equated credits. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.8 Tutoring
Tutoring is the provision of supplementary instruction at all levels and in all types of courses for students requiring such assistance. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Tutoring shall be provided on a regular basis to students with deficiencies in skills or substantial lack of appropriate academic background for essential course work. Tutoring shall be provided by qualified tutors upon the recommendation of the regular teachers of the pertinent subject matter. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
A tutor, to be considered qualified and eligible to participate in this Program, is defined as one with sensitivity to the special needs of disadvantaged students and certified by the chairperson of the appropriate department or by his or her designee(s) as qualified to tutor in the subject matter. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.9 Counseling
Counseling is the provision of academic, personal, financial and other related services by professionally trained personnel. Counseling shall be concentrated on the maximization of the academic possibilities, prospects and progress of the SEEK student. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
2.10 Financial Aid
Student financial assistance is the provision of necessary financial support, to the extent possible, to enable the economically disadvantaged student to attend college. The primary responsibility for the packaging and awarding of financial aid to SEEK students shall be vested in the college Financial Aid Office. The SEEK Department shall perform liaison, SEEK student advocacy, and shall coordinate functions with regard to the financial aid of individual students and the interpretation of policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
3 College Plans
Each senior college president shall annually submit to the Chancellor two college plans covering the SEEK Program for the ensuing year: a College Academic Plan and a College Fiscal Accountability Plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Among the major objectives of these required college Plans are: to ensure that the common purposes of the Program are served and the achievements of each individual Plan are rendered susceptible to reasonable monitoring; to encourage innovative educational approaches to the problems of the educationally disadvantaged; and to permit, within the framework of relevant law and this policy, justified diversity and flexibility in organization and structure arising from the differences among the different colleges. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plans shall contain a precise description of both administrative and academic management for the Program in budgetary, personnel, and management terms. The Plans shall include provisions for summer session offerings for pre-freshmen and continuing Program students. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
These college Plans shall be in a form, and contain such detailed elements, as shall be outlined by the Chancellor. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The preparation of these college Plans shall be the direct responsibility of the President. The Plans shall be submitted in accordance with a timetable provided by the Chancellor through the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The two Plans are to cover the following subjects (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) The college Academic Plan shall cover the provision of all components of the SEEK Program as defined in this policy, along with both regular and special instruction (including summer sessions), and shall reflect the provisions of the HEOP Act, State Budget requirements, and the requirements of this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) The college Fiscal Accountability Plan shall describe the projected system at the college for receiving, disbursing, and reporting on the use of SEEK funds in accordance with legal requirements, State budget and audit requirements, and the requirements of this policy . (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Chancellor, through the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, may accept or require modifications in each of these college Plans, based on legal requirements, the requirements of external authorities, or the requirements of this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
College Plans, upon approval by the Chancellor, shall be reported to the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research through the General Plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
4 The Academic Plan
As prescribed in content and form by the Chancellor, each senior college president shall submit to the Chancellor, through the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, an Academic Plan that contains the elements outlined in this policy. The Plan shall include provision for the summer session offerings referred to in this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Since the prime objective of this policy is to promote the improvement of educational outcomes for SEEK students, it is required that each Academic Plan approved by the Chancellor contain a description not only of the special courses to be offered, but also a statement of their articulation with relevant regular college course offerings and a specification of all programmatic services defined in this policy, such as compensatory education and tutoring and the mode of their offering and availability. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In summary, the Plan shall (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Detail the specific academic goals of the particular SEEK Program at the college, and the means to be used to achieve these goals
b) Outline the overall curricular approach or approaches to be utilized
c) Describe the educational content of the Program
d) Contain provision for a sufficient number of quantifiable indicators of student achievement to facilitate reasonable evaluation
The Plan shall cover a five-year program plus two summer sessions for each student, as individually required, with the first year focused on intensive remediation in basic skills, subject to modification in individual cases based upon progress achieved in acquiring the necessary basic skills, as determined by testing or otherwise. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
A description of remedial, developmental, and compensatory course offerings provided for SEEK students shall be included in the Plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
A description of the SEEK Summer Program Component of the University Skills Immersion Program and any other special summer school offerings in basic skills and in developmental and compensatory courses and programs shall also be included in the Plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall provide for the availability of tutoring and counseling into the third, fourth and fifth years. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall include provisions for the monitoring of compulsory attendance by SEEK students in SEEK courses and classes, as required by this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan may include proposals for experimentally structured deviations from this policy. Any such proposed deviations shall be clearly identified, described in detail, and defined as experimental in nature, with the length of the experimental period specified. Each such proposal shall also contain provision for suitable evaluation mechanisms and an adequate description of the expected results of the experimental deviation or program innovation in question. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan, by use of the University’s Skills Assessment Program, shall identify improvement in the academic capabilities and achievements of SEEK students. Such academic progress indicators shall be used for the evaluation of programmatic success on each campus. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall contain provision for monitoring the academic aspects of the Program by the SEEK Director, as appropriate, as well as by pertinent academic and administrative authorities. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall be subject to review, approval, as well as subsequent monitoring, and evaluation by the Chancellor through the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
5 Fiscal Accountability Plan
As specified in content and form by the Chancellor, each senior college President shall submit to the Chancellor a Fiscal Accountability Plan containing the elements outlined in this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Fiscal Accountability Plan shall describe the projected pattern of expenditures for the college SEEK Program, including the projected percentage of SEEK Program and college funds to be allocated to each of the support services and the projected means of tracking such expenditures. The projected pattern of expenditures of SEEK and non-SEEK funds shall include, but not be limited to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Academic credit instructional costs
b) Other instructional costs
c) Remediation
d) Counseling
e) Supplemental financial assistance
f) Research and evaluation
g) Administrative costs
h) Tutoring
i) SEEK Summer Program Component of the University Skills Immersion Program and the SEEK Component of the Intersession Program costs
If it is proposed that SEEK and other college program activities be combined in particular courses or programs, the Plan shall specify the exact extent, for funding purposes, of the participation of SEEK students, faculty or staff in the combined activities. The Plan shall include information on projected exchanges of SEEK funds and/or services provided by SEEK-funded staff. Any exchange of funds and/or services must be in consultation with, and with the approval of, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee and the SEEK Program Director. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall be applicable to a five-year program plus two summer sessions. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall contain provision for monitoring the fiscal aspects of the Program by the SEEK Director, as appropriate, as well as by pertinent fiscal and administrative authorities. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Plan shall be subject to review and approval, as well as to subsequent monitoring and evaluation, by the Chancellor through the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Budget and Finance, and the Office of theVice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
6 Monitoring, Reporting and Evaluation
It shall be the President’s responsibility in each college to monitor the implementation, application, and enforcement of this policy, and of that college’s approved Academic Plan and Fiscal Accountability Plan. He or she shall take whatever steps are necessary to fulfill this responsibility, including such delegations of responsibility he or she deems necessary, and submit reports on same to the Chancellor, the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Affairs as part of the periodic reports referred to below. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The SEEK Director shall be generally responsible for monitoring and reporting to the president, from the perspective of the SEEK Department, on the implementation of this policy, and specifically on the academic progress of all SEEK students and their receipt of all College and SEEK funded services for which the students are eligible. The Academic Plan, along with the Fiscal Accountability Plan, shall specify the means whereby these monitoring responsibilities are to be discharged. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The results of such monitoring shall be reported to the Chancellor, who shall periodically forward such reports to the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research. It shall be the responsibility of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, at the direction of the Chancellor, to see that the necessary reporting and monitoring are carried out on each campus. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
These reports shall focus on the implementation of the Academic Plan and the Fiscal Accountability Plan. They may also include data required for inclusion in the State mandated annual Final Report, including, but not limited to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Credit accumulation
b) Grade point averages
c) Rate of movement of SEEK students into the second, third, fourth and possible fifth year of their programs
d) Rate of disbursement of SEEK funds in the various functional categories
The president shall include a personal statement about the progress of the local program relative to the goals of the University-wide Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7 Structure and Administration at the Campus Level
7.1 Components of the Program
There shall be a SEEK Program at each senior college. The Program, which shall be the overall responsibility of the president, faculty and staff of the college, shall include the following components as authorized under the Higher Education Opportunity Program Act (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Intensive remediation and preparation for college-level work through remedial, developmental and compensatory courses and through summer and intersession classes
b) Special tutoring, counseling and advisement services
c) Financial aid in accordance with criteria and guidelines promulgated by the University, subject to approval by the appropriate external authorities
d) Program administration
e) Program research and evaluation
With respect to the instructional component of the Program, it is the intent of this policy that each involved college provide a clearly defined, specifically described, integrated, sequential curriculum designed to develop the basic skills of SEEK students and progressively initiate these students in, and prepare them for, successful regular college level academic work. Intensive remedial and developmental instruction shall constitute the essence of such an integrated curriculum and is to be accorded the highest priority. The college shall place major emphasis on accelerating the movement of newly enrolled SEEK students towards initiating and pursuing studies within the regular college curriculum. Compulsory attendance is mandated for SEEK students in all remedial, developmental and compensatory courses for which they are registered. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.2 SEEK Department Responsibilities
As part of the Program, each senior college shall establish a SEEK Department that shall be responsible for providing the following academic and support services (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Remedial and developmental instruction in reading, writing, speech and English and the SEEK Summer Program Component of the University Skills Immersion Program and the SEEK Component of the Intersession Program. Remedial and developmental instruction in mathematics shall be provided by the mathematics department. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) Comprehensive tutoring that is coordinated with intensive remedial and developmental instruction. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) Academic advisement and financial and personal counseling. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
d) Liaison and coordination with the college Financial Aid Office regarding financial aid services for SEEK students. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
As part of the college Academic Plan, the President may propose departures from the above assignments of responsibilities, permitting specified remedial and developmental courses in reading, writing, speech, and English to be provided by academic departments, and in the case of mathematics, by the SEEK Department, or jointly by two or more departments including the SEEK Department. Any such proposal shall describe in detail the extent, nature and purpose of the proposed departure from the above assignments, and shall include provision for testing and/or demonstrating the efficacy thereof. All remedial and developmental courses included in such proposals shall be developed by special joint curricular committees drawn from both the SEEK Department and the relevant department(s). Any proposed departure shall be subject to the approval of the Chancellor prior to its institution. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.3 SEEK Department Personnel and Organization
The SEEK Department shall be a department of the college. All persons appointed as SEEK counselors or for teaching courses offered by the SEEK Department shall be appointed upon the recommendation of this department in accordance with established procedures of the college. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Personnel and Budget Committee of the department shall be elected in accordance with the governance plan of the college; however, all those persons who hold faculty rank or status shall be eligible to vote. The majority of the Committee shall be persons who hold tenure or certificates of continuous employment. The chairperson of the department shall be the chairperson of the committee. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
With respect to appointment, reappointment, promotion, or tenure and certificate of continuous employment, instructional and counseling staff of the SEEK Department, like all other University personnel, continue to be subject to University provisions for classroom observation (where appropriate), student evaluation (if appropriate) and annual evaluation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.4 SEEK Director
The director of the SEEK Program in each senior college shall also be the chairperson of the SEEK Department (or of whatever department configuration of which the SEEK Department, as defined in this policy, is a part). He or she shall be recommended for appointment by the president to a professorial leve1 title, subject to the by-laws and procedures of the Board of Trustees of the University . The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs shall report on this recommendation for appointment to the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research and the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Such functions that the president may assign to the SEEK director, in addition to those primary functions specified in this policy, shall be germane and related to these primary functions and shall be covered in the Academic Plan as well as, from a fiscal viewpoint, in the Fiscal Accountability Plan. In addition to the responsibility for administering the functions and services vested in the SEEK Department, the Director shall also be responsible, under the president, in accordance with the Academic Plan, for monitoring all SEEK funding, the support programs provided by other departments, and for the advocacy and representation of SEEK students from admission to graduation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In recommending the appointment of a SEEK director to the Board of Trustees for its approval, the president shall utilize the services of a screening committee—at least two-thirds of whose members shall be from the SEEK Department, including students—appointed by him or her to submit a minimum of three names for his or her consideration. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.5 Counselors and Counseling
Counselors shall be appointed and employed in the SEEK Department. At such a ratio of counselors to students as is funded by the State, the counselors shall provide professional counseling in academic, financial, vocational and personal matters to SEEK students, with the major objective of furthering the student’s academic possibilities, prospects and progress. Counselors shall conduct and maintain liaison with classroom instructors in and out of the SEEK Department and shall be responsible for monitoring student progress and, to the extent possible class attendance, and for maintaining the records thereof. A precise register of contacts between students and counselors is to be maintained in the SEEK Department. The Academic Plan may provide the same or similar encouragement and sanctions for student participation in counseling sessions as for class attendance. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.6 Compensatory Courses in Academic Departments
As part of the SEEK Program on each senior college campus, compensatory courses for SEEK students may be offered by the regular academic departments of the college. All persons hired for the purposes of teaching such courses or assigned to teach such courses shall be hired and/or assigned by the appropriate academic department, in consultation with the director of the SEEK Program, and shall be employed in the appropriate academic departments. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Special capability for teaching disadvantaged students shall be one of the criteria for such hiring or assignment. In connection with such compensatory instruction, special tutors shall be hired by the SEEK Department, upon the certification of the tutor by pertinent academic departments. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The academic departments are to be required to offer the compensatory courses described in the college academic plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.7 Faculty Designations and Appointments
In colleges at which remedial courses are proposed to be taught by faculty employed and appointed in the academic departments in accordance with approved Academic Plans that depart from this policy’s assignments of responsibilities, the designation of faculty to teach such courses, and the appointment and reappointment of such faculty, shall be made in consultation with the SEEK Director. If after consultation, the SEEK director elects to enter a formal objection to a particular designation or appointment or reappointment, the designation, or the personnel action in question shall be reviewed by the President who shall have before him or her the relevant documentation. In cases in which faculty employed and appointed in the SEEK Department are designated to teach courses that depart from this policy’s assignments of responsibilities, the chairpersons of the pertinent academic departments shall be analogously consulted in regard to such designations or personnel actions, with the same entitlement to file with the president a formal objection to such designation or personnel action. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.8 Faculty Evaluation and Review
Faculty designated to teach developmental courses and employed in the SEEK Department shall be evaluated by the SEEK Department, but also reviewed separately by the pertinent academic department with the academic department report being submitted both to the SEEK Department and to the Dean of Faculty. Faculty who are so designated or appointed and employed in an academic department shall be evaluated by the appropriate academic department, but also reviewed, separately, by the SEEK Department, with the SEEK Department report being submitted both to the appropriate academic department and to the dean of faculty. Mathematics faculty designated to teach remedial courses and faculty assigned to teach compensatory courses shall be evaluated and reviewed in accordance with the same process. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The reviews by both the SEEK Department and the academic department shall include reference to teaching effectiveness and sensitivity to the learning patterns of disadvantaged students and reference to the academic content and substance taught. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.9 Transfer of Personnel
Each member of the SEEK classroom teaching faculty whose position is transferred to an academic department, or each member of an academic department faculty whose position is transferred to the SEEK Department, under the terms of or as a result of this policy, or any other teaching faculty transfer effected under the terms of or as a result of this policy, shall be transferred in the same rank and tenure or CCE status as held in the previous department. Participation in the governance of the department to which the individual is transferred shall be on the same basis as other members of that department. Any other personnel transferred from the SEEK Department to another department, or to any analogous division under the terms of or as a result of this policy shall be similarly protected in present rank and standing. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The notifications of reappointment, non-reappointment, tenure, or CCE, shall be binding on the receiving department. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.10 Faculty Qualifications
All faculty in the SEEK Program shall have those qualifications or professional achievement and training required of faculty members in the rank of lecturer (full-time), instructor, assistant professor, associate professor and professor, and be appointed through the regular channels of the college and the University. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.11 Tutoring
Provision for a structured tutoring program shall be a key element of every campus SEEK Program and a detailed description thereof, including provision for orientation and training, shall be part of each college Academic Plan. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
As specified in this policy, a tutor must be certified as a qualified tutor by the chairperson of the appropriate department, or his or her designee(s), based on the tutor’s knowledge of the subject matter, discipline and sensitivity to the special academic needs of disadvantaged students. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
With respect to tutoring services offered to SEEK students by the SEEK Department, tutors shall be hired, supervised and monitored by the SEEK Department. Precise records shall be maintained by the SEEK Department of the tutoring services provided, and periodic evaluations of the results of such services shall be conducted. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
With respect to tutoring services offered to SEEK students by the other departments, tutors shall be hired by the SEEK Department upon recommendation and certification of the pertinent academic department. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
These tutors shall be supervised and monitored by the academic department, in consultation with the SEEK Department, and precise records of the tutoring services provided shall be maintained. Periodic evaluations of the results of such services shall be conducted. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
7.12 Research and Data Collection
Subject to appropriate funding, each campus SEEK Program shall establish a research and data unit, housed in the SEEK Department, which, under the SEEK director, shall, among its assigned functions, be available to provide the data and research requirements of the University’s Office of Special Programs. If funding for a campus SEEK research and data unit is unavailable from the University or the colleges, the SEEK director, with the cooperation and support of other offices of the college, will be responsible for collecting the data for the SEEK campus annual report, the Academic and Fiscal Plans, and the General Plan of the Office of Special Programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8 Structure and Administration at The University Level
8.1 Board of Trustees and Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs
The Board of Trustees is ultimately responsible for the policies, programs, personnel, and funding allocations of the SEEK Program, subject to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) State and local law
b) Regulations and requirements of the Regents and the State Department of Education
c) Requirements of State and City Budget Offices. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Office of Special Programs has been incorporated into the Office of Academic Affairs. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs will report on Special Programs to both the University’s Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs and the Board of Trustees Committee on Academic Policy, Program, and Research. However, the Board of Trustees Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs is responsible, at the Board of Trustees’ direction, for considering and making recommendations to the Board of Trustees on all policy matters for the SEEK Program, under the terms of this policy and the By-laws, resolutions, and policy statements of the Board of Trustees. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.2 Chancellor
The Chancellor is responsible for the administration and operation of the SEEK Program through the presidents, faculties, and staff of the colleges and, in particular, for the central coordination of the Program, including the allocation and monitoring of SEEK funding under the direction of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.3 Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs shall be responsible, under the direction of the Chancellor, for the central coordination of the SEEK Program and for the discharge of such responsibilities of the Office of Special Programs as are specified in this policy and assigned to him or her by the Chancellor. The central coordination of SEEK academic and personnel matters, budget matters, and non-academic personnel matters shall be effected under the direction of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs in coordination and collaboration with appropriate University administrative offices; i.e., the Office of Student Development, the Office of Budget and Finance, and the Office of Faculty and Staff Relations. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.4 University Dean for Academic Affairs
The University Dean for Academic Affairs is responsible for assuring the quality of the SEEK Program and its consistency with the mission of the University, the campuses, and the New York State Higher Educational Opportunity Act. the University Dean is also responsible for the oversight of the Office of Special Programs and the SEEK Programs at the ten senior colleges. Oversight includes monitoring, reporting, research and advisement on the practices, procedures and policies affecting the programs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.5 Director of Office of Special Programs
The Director of the Office of Special Programs, under the oversight and direction of the University Dean for Academic Affairs, shall be responsible for the oversight, direction and functioning of the Office of Special Programs, and for the discharge of such functions as are vested in the Office of Special Programs by this policy or by the direction of the Chancellor and/or the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (!@#$%)
8.6 Office of Special Programs
The Office of Special Programs shall be part of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
a) The coordination, compilation, and preparation of the SEEK general plan, the SEEK Final Report, and such other reports as are required by the Chancellor, the Board of Trustees, and by external authorities. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) The coordination of the monitoring, reporting, and evaluation processes, set forth in this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) The initiation and conduct of research and evaluation of the SEEK Program directed at programmatic improvements; the coordination of campus research and data collection units, in consultation and coordination with the University’s Office of Institutional Research and Assessment under the direction of the Chancellor; and the promotion of the exchange of information on research and development activities with and among the individual campuses. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
d) The provision of assistance in program planning and development as a continuous effort aimed at enhancing program quality. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
e) The promotion and conduct of University-wide training for SEEK administrators and faculties. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
f) Other functions, duties, responsibilities and activities as may be assigned to it by the Chancellor and/or the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.7 SEEK Budget
The SEEK Budget, as prepared for submission to funding authorities, shall be developed by the Office of Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Presidents, and through them, with the campus SEEK directors, and submitted to the Office of Budget and Finance as part of the University budget request process. Thereafter, any reallocation, modification or reduction of funds based on shortfalls from the requested budget shall be determined by the Chancellor through the Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Budget and Finance with the individual campuses. Such allocations, modifications or retrenchments shall be in conformity with the purposes and criteria set forth in this policy and in consideration of the fiscal accountability plan for the college in question. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
8.8 Research and Development
Leadership in research and development in basic skills and compensatory education for under- prepared and disadvantaged students shall constitute a major responsibility of the Chancellor’s Office and of the leadership of the SEEK Program, both in the University’s Office of Special Programs and on the campuses. To this end, funding should be provided for professional research and evaluation staff and consultants, as needed. These staff and consultants shall work in the University’s Office of Special Programs—and at the individual campus programs as deemed appropriate—in collaboration with the University’s Office of Institutional Research and Assessment to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Assemble and analyze campus-collected and centrally-collected data
b) Conduct special studies
c) Help develop student progress criteria sensitive to the complex backgrounds and needs of SEEK students but based on “hard” data, capable of utilization as progress indicators for SEEK and other disadvantaged students individually and in the aggregate
9 Student Eligibility
The SEEK Program is designed to serve the student who is both educationally and economically disadvantaged. A disadvantaged student is an individual from a low-income family with potential for a successful higher education experience but who has not acquired all of the basic academic skills required to successfully compete in a higher education environment. Generally, a student who is eligible for the Program has not earned a Regents diploma, is from a high school that has a poor record for academically preparing students, has been tracked or scheduled into a general high school program, has earned a New York State approved General Equivalency Diploma, has been out of high school for a number of years, or ranks low on traditional measures of college admissions criteria, such as high school average and class standing. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Eligibility requirements for admission into the SEEK Program must comply with the requirements of State law and regulations issued by the State Department of Education. The Regents require that students be both economically and academically disadvantaged; the Regents define economic disadvantage and the Board of Trustees of the University defines academic disadvantage. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
9.1 General Requirements
A student eligible for benefits under the SEEK Program must meet all of the following criteria (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Be both economically and educationally disadvantaged according to the criteria in this policy. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) Be a high school graduate or have a New York State approved General Equivalency Diploma or its equivalent. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) Have not previously attended a college or university, except in the case of students enrolled in the State University of New York’s Educational Opportunity Program (EOP), or the independent colleges’ Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP), or be a veteran who has earned no more than 18 credits of college level work prior to entrance into the service—except for USAF (United States Armed Forces) and service-connected University of Maryland credits. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
d) Be a resident of New York State according to the criteria promulgated by the Higher Education Services Corporation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
9.2 Academic Eligibility Criteria for First-time Students
Criteria for first-time freshmen include (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) New York State Regents Rules state that, “the basic test of educational disadvantage is non-admissibility by the college’s normal admissions standards to the college at the matriculated status in a degree program.” Further proof of academic eligibility is non-admissibility to a degree program for which application is made, i.e., a student is an applicant to a program that the Chancellor has identified as a program with highly competitive admissions standards, but the student lacks a high school sequence in mathematics and science or other specific subject matter normally required for such a program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) The student has received a New York State approved General Equivalency Diploma. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
c) The student has earned a college admissions average of less than eighty percent or a rank in his or her class in the sixty-fifth or lower percentile. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
d) The student has earned a college admissions average of eighty percent or above or a rank in class above the sixty-fifth percentile, but has received extensive remedial assistance in high school so that, in accordance with procedures established by the Chancellor, the student is determined to have need for the range of support services available to students in the SEEK Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
9.3 Economic Eligibility Criteria for First-time Students
For purposes of determining economic eligibility, a student must meet the economic eligibility criteria established by the New York State Commissioner of Education. The economic eligibility criteria apply to the calendar year prior to the academic year of the student’s first entry to college. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
10 Student Financial Aid
Upon admission, all SEEK students must meet the economic eligibility criteria as established by the Commissioner of Education. First semester SEEK students may be permitted to register prior to the verification of his or her economic eligibility, if the student has complied with all requests to submit economic verification documents. If, upon receipt and analysis of economic verification documents the student is deemed not to be economically eligible to participate in the program, the student shall be so notified and removed from the SEEK Program rolls. The student is not allowed to receive SEEK funds during this provisional period. The established economic criteria will apply to students at the time of admission into the SEEK Program. If the student’s economic status improves in subsequent years, then an appropriate adjustment in the amount of SEEK financial assistance shall be made to reflect the change in the student’s need. However, his or her entitlement to receive other support services offered by the Program shall not be affected. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The Rules of the Regents require that, in order to receive SEEK funds and other support services, a SEEK student must file (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) An application for a basic educational opportunity grant (Pel1 Grant) with the appropriate agency of the Federal Government for the academic year in which benefits are sought. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
b) An application for TAP or STAP with the Higher Education Services Corporation. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Each college, through its Financial Aid Office, shall be responsible for ensuring that all SEEK students file for these forms of aid in accordance with the Rules of the Regents and the guidelines established by the University and approved by the State Division of the Budget. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
In order to be eligible for SEEK financial aid and other support services, all SEEK students must be full-time students. Full-time status shall be defined as a minimum course load of at least twelve credits and/or equated credits, or its equivalent. However, if due to personal or family responsibilities, a student has to register part-time for a particular term, that student must receive approval to do so from the Program Director. Part-time status is granted for only one semester and extended only through a waiver granted by the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee. A student will be allowed to receive financial aid on a part-time basis if he or she meets the economic eligibility criteria for it. A student is eligible for STAP if his or her minimum full-time course load—i.e., twelve credits and/or equated credits—includes fifty percent or six hours of non-credit remedial, developmental or compensatory coursework. For the purpose of TAP eligibility a full-time SEEK student is a student enrolled for at least twelve credits or a combination of credits and equated credits—three of which must be credits—in the first semester of State supported TAP study, and six credits in the second and subsequent semesters of State supported TAP study. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Each student who registers as a full-time student is expected to maintain a minimum course load of twelve credits or equated credits, per semester including remedial, developmental and compensatory courses. However, a student may be granted permission during the semester to drop courses with no change to his or her stipend level, provided that (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Such a drop is recommended by his or her counselor
b) The recommendation is reviewed by the Financial Aid Office and approved by the SEEK director
c) Proper authorization is kept on file
d) The number of credits and/or equated credits does not drop below nine
Full-time students on academic probation will retain the full financial aid and academic support services of the Program. Students who are placed on “academic probation with a part-time course load” will retain the full academic supportive services of the Program. This student will be allowed to receive financial aid on a part-time basis if he or she meets the economic criteria for it. Furthermore, a graduating student, whose degree requirements would be met with less than the minimum course load requirements may be permitted to register for only those courses that are required for graduation. That student will also retain the full academic supportive services of the Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
11 Period of Student Funding Eligibility
11.1 Four-year baccalaureate program
A student is allowed ten semesters of opportunity program financial aid eligibility and two college summer sessions plus the SEEK Summer Program Component of the University Skills Immersion Program and intersessions for completion of a four-year baccalaureate degree program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
11.2 Five-year baccalaureate program
A student is allowed twelve semesters or the equivalent of opportunity program eligibility in a registered five-year baccalaureate degree program and two college summer sessions plus the SEEK Summer Program Component of the University Skills Immersion Program and intersessions for completion of a five-year baccalaureate degree program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
When a SEEK student has utilized the state financial assistance program of STAP during his or her career, that student would be entitled to one or two additional semesters of SEEK financial aid support. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
When a SEEK student has not been a STAP recipient but will be graduating upon completion of the eleventh semester, that student would be eligible for an additional semester of SEEK financial aid support—the eleventh semester. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Requests for exemptions for individuals who do not fall into these categories may be submitted to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his or her designee. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
12 Retention Standards
Students in the SEEK Program shall be subject to the retention standards of the college in which they are enrolled. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The standard probationary period for all SEEK Program students shall be a maximum of two consecutive semesters. Students who fail to achieve the required standards after the probationary period shall be dropped from the Program. The regular academic appeals procedure of each college shall continue to consider individual cases and, taking into account the recommendation of the SEEK director, to grant exceptions as warranted. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The maximum length of time for a leave of absence shall not exceed three consecutive semesters. Where special circumstances warrant, requests for exceptions, along with appropriate justification, shall be transmitted by the SEEK director to the University’s Office of Special Programs for appropriate action. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
13 Student Attendance
Attendance by SEEK students in remedial, developmental and compensatory courses is to be considered compulsory for those students enrolled in such courses. University policy requires compulsory attendance of all students enrolled in remedial, developmental and compensatory courses. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
14 SEEK Student Rights and Responsibilities
Students in the SEEK Program are recognized as matriculated, full and equal members of the student body of the college at which they are enrolled, and are entitled to all the rights and privileges, as well as subject to all the obligations, of students at the college and, as SEEK students, to special services and also special obligations. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Subject to the provisions of this policy, the additional entitlements and responsibilities of SEEK students are listed but are not limited to (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D):
a) Access to SEEK counseling and other support services throughout their career as SEEK students
b) Access to SEEK funded tutoring on an as-needed basis in relation to all of the students’ course work at the college, whether lower division or upper division
c) Access to financial support, including State special program funding, on an individual as-needed basis
d) Compulsory full-time attendance in all basic skills, developmental and compensatory courses in which they are enrolled
15 Financial Aid Administration
The principal objective of student financial assistance is to provide the necessary financial support, to the extent possible, to enable the economically disadvantaged student to attend college. The college Financial Aid Office shall be responsible for the processing, awarding and overseeing of all financial aid for SEEK students. The supervision of all financial aid to SEEK students shall be vested in the Financial Aid Office, in consultation with the SEEK Director or his or her designee. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The college financial aid director shall be responsible for the packaging and awarding of financial aid to SEEK students, in accordance with the guidelines and criteria established by the University and the funding authorities. The financial aid director shall also be responsible for verifying SEEK student economic eligibility for the purpose of making financial aid awards and for admission into the SEEK Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
Appointments of SEEK financial aid officers to work on the packaging and documentation of financial aid awards for SEEK students shall be made by the SEEK director in consultation with the financial aid director. For personnel purposes, all SEEK financial aid officers shall be considered members of the SEEK Department. SEEK financial aid officers shall report to and work under the direction of the director of financial aid, but shall be responsible to the SEEK director. They shall work in such places as may be assigned by the financial aid director; however, their primary duty shall be to serve SEEK students. To provide the necessary service to SEEK Program students, a SEEK financial aid officer shall be designated as coordinator of SEEK financial aid at each campus. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The SEEK coordinator of financial aid shall function as liaison within the college financial aid office and assist individual SEEK students with their financial problems; he or she shall serve as advocate for individual students on an as-needed basis with the Financial Aid Office and with other available sources of financial support. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The SEEK coordinator of financial aid shall report to and be responsible to the SEEK director. He or she shall be trained by the University’s Office of Special Programs and the University Student Financial Aid Office on the financial aid process and sources of financial assistance. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The director of financial aid shall prepare a written statement setting forth his or her assessment of the work of the SEEK coordinator and financial aid officers. This assessment shall be sent to the SEEK director. The SEEK director shall incorporate the views of the Director of Financial Aid in his or her annual evaluation of the SEEK coordinator and financial aid officers. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
All personnel action recommendations affecting the SEEK financial aid officers will be initiated by the director of the SEEK Program. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
An evaluation of the financial aid director and his or her office, from the perspective of the services provided to SEEK students, shall be made annually by the SEEK director and filed with the financial aid director and the president. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
16 Annual General Plan and Annual Final Report
As required by the Higher Education Opportunity Act and the regulations of the Board of Regents, the University shall develop and submit to the State authorities an annual General Plan and an annual Final Report covering the organization, development, coordination, and operation of the SEEK Program. The General Plan and Final Report shall include such information and data as may be required. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
The University’s Office of Special Programs shall be responsible for the coordination, compilation and final preparation of the annual SEEK General Plan and the annual Final Report for submission to the State authorities, subject to approval by the Chancellor and the Board of Trustees. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)
It shall be each president’s responsibility to insure the timely submission of campus information and data required for the General Plan and Final Report. (BTM,1994,06-27,007,_D)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.28 Transfers – General Education :

Policy 1.28 Transfers – General Education
[T]he portion of CUNY’s General Education Framework that is common to all CUNY colleges, to be called the “Common Core,” will total 30 credits. The other portion of CUNY’s General Education Framework, the portion that is specific to each baccalaureate college, to be called the “College Option,” will consist of an additional 12 credits.
All CUNY undergraduates will be required to complete the 30-credit Common Core in order to graduate with an A.A., A.S., or baccalaureate degree. All students who satisfactorily complete courses within the Common Core will be certified as having achieved partial or full completion of the Common Core, as appropriate, and that certification will transfer among all CUNY colleges.
All CUNY baccalaureate students will be required to complete 12 College-Option general education credits as well in order to graduate (except as specified below for students who transfer from associate- to baccalaureate-degree programs). College-Option general education credits will transfer as such among all CUNY baccalaureate colleges.
In addition, all associate-degree students, including A.A.S. students, who transfer to baccalaureate programs will be required to complete the receiving college’s College-Option general education credits as follows:
1) Students who transfer with 30 or fewer total credits from any college (including non-CUNY regionally accredited colleges) will be required to earn a maximum of 12 of the receiving college’s College-Option general education credits;
2) Students who transfer with more than 30 total credits from any college (including non-CUNY regionally accredited colleges) but without an associate degree will be required to earn a maximum of 9 of the receiving college’s College-Option general education credits;
3) Students who transfer with an associate degree from any college (including non-CUNY regionally accredited colleges) will be required to earn a maximum of 6 of the receiving college’s College-Option general education credits.
Thus, in order to receive the A. A. or A. S. degree, students will be required to complete a total of 30 general education credits (the Common Core), and in order to receive the baccalaureate, students will be required to complete a total of 36 to 42 general education credits depending on the students’ transfer status. Further, no matter how many CUNY colleges any of these students attend, if a student transfers from one CUNY college to another, all general education course credits of all types will be accepted as general education credits of that type without further evaluation[.]
[T]he Chancellor, in consultation with the Council of Presidents, the University Faculty Senate, and the University Student Senate, will convene a Task Force of faculty, students, and academic administrators, with faculty members predominant, and charge it with recommending to the Chancellor a structure for the Common Core by December 1, 2011.
The Task Force will develop the broad disciplinary or interdisciplinary areas constituting the Common Core for the University, as defined by learning outcomes. It will also identify the number of credits to be allocated to each such area. Within these guidelines, the Task Force may make more specific recommendations regarding individual associate- and baccalaureate-degree programs, such as Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs.
The Task Force will consist of a steering committee, including balanced representation from the college sectors, as well as a working committee, including representatives from all undergraduate colleges and all large-enrollment disciplines. The steering committee will have the authority to establish subcommittees consisting of Task Force members and others in various fields and areas of expertise as needed[.]
[A]fter the Task Force has advanced its recommendations and the Chancellor has approved the structure of the Common Core, all CUNY undergraduate colleges will specify individual courses for this Core. These courses must meet the approved learning outcomes. Working with the colleges, the University Office of Academic Affairs will facilitate the expeditious review and approval of all courses proposed for the Common Core with the assistance of a CUNY-wide committee, appointed by the Chancellor, and consisting predominantly of faculty, to ensure that all learning outcomes are satisfied.
Any course or disciplinary area that is required of all students and is not specifically required for a student’s major must fall within the Common Core or College-Option courses.
The Common Core will apply to all A.A., A.S., and baccalaureate degrees. By New York State Education Department regulations, A.A.S. degrees contain fewer liberal arts credits than do A.A. or A.S. degrees. However, liberal arts requirements for A.A.S. degrees will be drawn from the courses approved for the Common Core such that A.A.S. students will receive partial certification for completion of the Core. If an A.A.S. student transfers to an A.A., A.S., or baccalaureate program, that student will need to complete the remainder of the 30-credit Core.
To insure that students in all degree programs have adequate information to plan their academic paths, colleges will clearly identify courses that are part of the Common Core or are College-Option courses, and all of these courses will be widely publicized by the University[.]
[E]ach college will submit for the approval of the Chancellor by April 1, 2012, its plan for implementation of the General Education Framework[.]
(BTM,2011,06-27,005,_M)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.29 Transfers – Other :

Policy 1.29 Transfers – Other
[C]lear pathways [shall] be created for the largest transfer majors. The Chancellor, in consultation with the Council of Presidents, the University Faculty Senate, and the University Student Senate, will convene relevant disciplinary committees consisting predominantly of faculty. By May 1, 2012, each such disciplinary committee will recommend for approval to the University Office of Academic Affairs no fewer than three and no more than six courses that will be accepted as entry-level courses for beginning the major, or as prerequisites for such courses, by all colleges offering those majors, and by Fall 2013 these courses must be offered and their status as major-entry courses widely publicized at each college offering the major[.]
[A]ll courses taken for credit at an undergraduate CUNY college [shall] be accepted for credit at every other CUNY undergraduate college, regardless of whether a specific equivalency exists at the transfer college, to an extent consistent with grade requirements and residency rules at the transfer colleges[.]
[S]tudents transferring from outside CUNY will have their courses evaluated expeditiously and will receive credits for general education, major, and elective courses if those courses meet the appropriate learning outcomes[.]
[A]s an additional component of improving transfer, an appeals mechanism will be established by the Chancellor for undergraduate students who wish to appeal denial or restriction of transfer credit[.]
[A]ll possible technological assistance [shall] be brought to bear on providing the colleges with academic information about their transfer applicants, and on providing students and their advisors with information about the transferability and major-requirement status of courses[.]
[A]ll of these pathways policies and processes, including the Common Core, [shall] be reviewed and evaluated each year for three years beginning in 2013, and every three years thereafter, to modify them as necessary to improve them or to meet changing needs.
(BTM,2011,06-27,005,_M)
The Board of Trustees of the University affirms its commitment to all established University transfer policies and further directs that, effective Fall 2000, students who have earned a University AA or AS Degree will be deemed to have automatically fulfilled the lower division liberal arts and science distribution requirements for a baccalaureate degree. However, students may be asked to complete a course in a discipline required by a college’s baccalaureate distribution requirements that was not part of the student’s associates degree program.
Effective Fall 2000, when students transfer after completing a University Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degree, or prior to the completion of an Associate in Arts (AA), Associate in Science (AS), or Baccalaureate Degree, the liberal arts and science courses they have completed will be deemed to have fulfilled discipline-specific distribution requirements for all baccalaureate programs on a discipline by discipline basis, with the exception that upper division coursework will not be recognized unless appropriate pre-requisites have been satisfied.
The Chancellor, in consultation with the Council of Presidents and the faculty, including the Discipline Councils, shall establish a process that will entail a review of transfer program distribution requirements, ensure full implementation of all transfer policies including those related to student admission and testing, and ensure that the policies are properly interpreted and broadly disseminated to students, faculty and administrators.
(BTM,1999,11-22,005,_C)
All liberal arts courses taken in one City University of New York college are to be considered transferable with full credit to each college of the University. Full credit is to be granted for these courses in all departments and programs, and they are to be recognized for the fulfillment of degree requirements.
In order to maintain academic standards and to ensure a higher degree of probable achievement, all community college students will be required to pass all three freshman skills assessment tests, prior to transferring to a senior college. Those students who meet the admission requirements of a senior college, and who wish to transfer to a senior college from outside the University, shall be required to take the freshman skills assessment tests and be placed at the appropriate skills level as determined by the senior college.
The community colleges and senior colleges are to establish an articulation advisement unit at each of the colleges in order to counsel students on career goals, courses to be taken at the student’s college prior to transfer, and the requirements expected on transfer.
(BTM,1985,06-24,005,_D)
Graduates of University community college AAS nursing programs shall be admitted to a senior college nursing program on a space available basis. These students shall have first priority over all non-community college graduates. These students shall be assigned a priority for transfer based upon their grade point average and performance on the State Board, when available, as determined by the Office of Admission Services or the University Application Processing Center. All community college nursing graduates with an average above 2.50 who cannot be accommodated under this plan will have the option of entering a senior college as a matriculant in liberal arts.
(BTM,1972,12-18,006,_A)
The senior colleges shall institute orientation programs for the University community college transfer students to facilitate their adjustment.
(BTM,1967,05-22,016,__)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.291 Travel Guidelines :

Policy 1.291 Travel Guidelines
[T]he Office of Academic Affairs; Office of Environmental, Health, Safety, and Risk Management; and Office of the General Counsel, on behalf of the Board of Trustees, [shall] issue International Travel Guidelines for Safety and Risk Management and Domestic Travel Guidelines for Safety and Risk Management for The City University of New York.
(BTM,2011,11-28,004,_A)

ARTICLE I ACADEMIC POLICY, PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

Policy 1.30 Writing Across the Curriculum :

Policy 1.30 Writing Across the Curriculum
Each college shall intensify and expand its programmatic efforts to strengthen the teaching of writing in courses across the curriculum and such efforts shall ensure that quality writing skills are fostered in all disciplinary areas. (BTM,1999,01-25,005,_B)
Each college’s commitment to Writing-Across-the-Curriculum requirements shall be supported by faculty development initiatives and by University initiatives, such as the University Writing Fellows Program, that will sponsor specially trained the University doctoral students who will assist in the delivery of intensive writing instruction. (BTM,1999,01-25,005,_B)
Periodically, each college shall provide the Chancellor’s Office with a report detailing its implementation of these initiatives. (BTM,1999,01-25,005,_B)